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Eugene Delacroix Most Famous Paintings
Dawit Abeza
Eugene Delacroix Most Famous Paintings

Eugene Delacroix Most Famous Paintings

Who is Eugene Delacroix?

Ferdinand Eugene Victor Delacroix, also well-known as Eugene Delacroix, was a French artist who significantly influenced the romantic movement. Known as the "master of color," Delacroix became a student of English architects in the romantic landscape and used their techniques to develop a unique approach to memory of color.

Delacroix's unique style improved the world of art, his painting skills had a long-lasting influence on the impressionist and post-impressionist movements. Today, Delacroix is known as one of the most important French romantic painters in the world, and his knowledge and humor are fully recognized and appreciated by art critics worldwide.

Eugène Delacroix's Famous Works

So without further ado, here are 10 of Eugène Delacroix's most famous paintings: 

  1. Liberty guides people through Eugène Delacroix
  2. Death of Sardanapalus by Eugène Delacroix
  3. The Chios Massacre by Eugène Delacroix
  4. The Barque of Dante by Eugène Delacroix
  5. Greece in the ruins of Missolonghi by Eugène Delacroix
  6. Sultan of Morocco by Eugène Delacroix
  7. The Battle of Nancy by Eugène Delacroix
  8. Jewish wedding in Morocco with Eugène Delacroix
  9. Orphan Girl at the Cemetery by Eugène Delacroix
  10. Mademoiselle Rose by Eugène Delacroix

Eugene Delacroix Artworks 

Liberty Leading the People Painting by Eugène Delacroix

Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix

Liberty Leading the People is an oil painting depicting the July Revolution of 1830 in Paris, France in which Charles X, the reformed Bourbon King, was removed from his throne.

The exaggerated scene of the rebellion is depicted, by showcasing a woman holding up the French flag as a sign of victory. Initially the painting had mixed reviews by critics. However, it was one of Delacroix's most popular paintings, a symbol of France's Revolution.

Delacroix quickly began painting this composition shortly after seeing the open war on the streets in Paris following protests against the prohibitory orders issued by Charles X on July 26, 1830. Louis-Philippe, the so-called citizen king, took over the throne and created a constitutional monarchy.

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Death of Sardanapalus by Eugène Delacroix

Death of Sardanapalus by Eugène Delacroix

The Death of Sardanapalus was inspired by the story of Sardanapalus, the last king of Assyria. This painting has vivid warm colors and detailed brush works. Delacroix designed it so the observer's would focus their attention from the right corner of the painting where you could observer the chaos (a woman being held). Then work your way up to the middle and top of the painting where there is a man lying in bed, who seems to be at peace in the middle of the chaos. 

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The Chios Massacre by Eugène Delacroix

 The Chios Massacre by Eugène Delacroix 

The Chios massacre by Eugène Delacroix is a giant painting that shows the horror and destruction that came to be on the island of Chios. It describes the killing of twenty thousand civilians. The painting is an exhibition of pain, military powers, terror, and death. 

As Baudelaire wrote in his Art Romantique: "In this work, all is desolation, massacre, and fire; everything bears witness to the eternal and incorrigible barbarism of man. Burnt-out and smoking cities, slaughtered vicitims, raped women, even children stabbed or thrown beneath the feet of horses, frenzied mothers; this whole work, I say, seems like a terrifying hymn composed to celebrate doom and irremediable suffering."

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The Barque of Dante by Eugène Delacroix

The Barque of Dante by Eugène Delacroix

This painting is based on Infernos Canto VIII, the first volume of the 14th-century epic poem The Divine Comedy, written by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. The poem is said to have captured Dante's journey through hell with his guide, the Roman poet Virgil. According to the poem, hell consists of nine concentric cycles of suffering that are on earth. Each cycle is a sin and is the place where those who have committed that sin are appropriately punished. Sinners in each circle are punished in a manner in which they committed their crimes. All sinners become unhappy due to the eternity of living the sin they have committed. The circles represent a gradual rise of evil that ends in the middle of the world where Satan is held captive.

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Greece in the ruins of Missolonghi by Eugène Delacroix

Greece on the Ruins of Missolonghi by Eugène Delacroix

Greece in the ruins of Missolonghi, is personified by a young woman. During the Greek war of independence from Ottoman occupation, Missolonghi was besieged in 1822 and 1823. During this second siege. The Turkish army destroyed Greece.

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Sultan of Morocco by Eugène Delacroix

The Sultan of Morocco by Eugène Delacroix

The Sultan of Morocco and his entourage are depicted in the Comte de Mornay's ambassadorial mission. Delacroix focused on creating a spectacular outdoor scene with bright light and vibrant colors.

 

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The Battle of Nancy by Eugène Delacroix

The Battle of Nancy by Eugène Delacroix

The Battle of Nancy was the result of the Delacroix's first official commission as an artist for the royal government in September 1828. The final decision was made after in-depth consultation with the King.

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Jewish wedding in Morocco with Eugène Delacroix

Jewish wedding in Morocco with Eugène Delacroix

Delacroix created this painting after seeing a Jewish Moroccan wedding. This is how he describes it:

"The Jewish wedding. Moors and Jews, at the entry. The two musicians. The violinist; thumb in air, the underside of the other hand very shaded, light behind, the haik around his head transparent in places; white sleeves, shadow behind. The violinist; seated on his heels and on the gelabia. The body of the guitar on the player's knee; very dark near the waist, red vest with brown notes, blue behind the neck. Shirt sleeves turned back up to the bi-ceps; green paneling beside him; a wart on the neck, short nose. Beside the violin, a pretty Jewish woman; vest, sleeves, gold and aramanthine. She is silhouetted partly against the door, partly against the wall. Closer, an older woman with a great deal of white that almost entirely hides her. Shadows full of reflections; white in the shadows. A pillar stands out darkly in front. The women at left arranged like flower pots. White and gold dominate, and their yellow handkerchiefs. Child on the ground in front. Beside the guitarist, the Jew who plays the tambourine.

His face is a dark silhouette, hiding part of the hand of the guitarist. The bottom of his head outlined against the wall. A bit of gelabia under the guitarist. In front of him, legs crossed, a young Jew who holds a plate. Gray garment. Leaning on his shoulder a young Jewish child about ten years old. Against the door of the stairway Prisciada; violet neckerchief on her head and under the neck. Jews seated on the steps, partly seen through the door, strong light on the nose, one standing on the stairs; a cast shadow, with reflections, standing out against the wall, light yellow reflection. Above, Jews leaning over. One at left, bareheaded, very dark, silhouetted against the wall lit by the sun. In the corner, the old Moor with his crooked beard: shaggy haik, turban low on his forehead, gray beard against the white. The other Moor, shorter nose, very male, prominent turban. One foot out of his slipper, sailor's vest and sleeves idem. On the ground, in front, the old Jew playing the tambourine; an old handkerchief on the ground, one sees the black skullcap. Torn gelabia; one sees the garment torn at the neck. Women in the shadow near the door, full of reflections."

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Orphan Girl at the Cemetery by Eugène Delacroix

Orphan Girl at the Cemetery by Eugène Delacroix

Eugène Delacroix painted an orphan in the cemetery in 1824. The compositions shows a young girl visiting a grave. Her watery eyes look up at the sky. Not knowing why her boyfriend was taken from her? Her expression conveys not only grief but a look reason.

The melancholy atmosphere of the orphan girl in the cemetery is enhanced by the dimly illuminated background, the paleness of the horizon, and the neglected dark cemetery, which give a feeling of despair. 

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Mademoiselle Rose by Eugène Delacroix 

Mademoiselle Rose by Eugène Delacroix

Delacroix painted this mysterious woman in a romantic style. The poet Charles Baudelaire describes Delacroix as "coldly determined to express passion as clearly as possible".

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Eugene Delacroix Paintings For Sale!

 

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