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100 Most Famous Paintings In The World [Masterpieces Of Art]
Dawit Abeza
100 Most Famous Paintings In The World [Masterpieces Of Art]

100 Most Famous Paintings In The World [Masterpieces Of Art]

Here are the top famous painters to ever exist and their masterpiece paintings.

Mona Lisa By Leonardo Da Vinci

Mona Lisa By Leonardo Da Vinci 

Leonardo’s Mona Lisa is one of the most famous paintings in the world. Today it is in the Louvre in Paris, but it was produced in Florence when Leonardo moved there to live from about 1500-1508. Mona Lisa looks directly out at us, the viewers, which was something unconventional for a woman in a portrait to do at this time. 

The Starry Night By Vincent Van Gogh

The Starry Night By Vincent Van Gogh

Starry Night is one of the most recognized pieces of art in the world. That Starry Night resonates with so many people is a testament to how its beauty is timeless and universal. 

The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli

The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli

The painting really demonstrates the goddess of adoration and excellence touching base ashore, on the island of Cyprus, conceived of the ocean shower and passed up the breezes, Zephyr and, maybe, Aura. The goddess is remaining on a monster scallop shell, as unadulterated and as flawless as a pearl. She is met by a young lady, who is in some cases recognized as one of the Graces or as the Hora of spring, and who holds out a shroud canvassed in blooms.

Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer

Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer 

Vermeer's most well-known painting. It's anything but a masterpiece, yet a 'tronie' – a canvas of a nonexistent figure. Delineate a specific kind of character; for this situation a young lady in an outlandish dress, wearing an oriental turban and an unrealistically huge pearl in her ear. 

The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci

The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci

The Last Supper is a late fifteenth-century wall painting by Italian craftsman Leonardo da Vinci housed by the refectory of the Convent of Santa Maria Delle Grazie in Milan, Italy. It is one of the Western world's most unmistakable compositions. 

The Kiss by Gustav Klimt

The Kiss by Gustav Klimt 

The Kiss is an oil painting, with included silver and gold leaf by the Austrian Symbolist painter Gustav Klimt, and was painted somewhere in the range of 1907 and 1908 during the tallness of Klimt's "Brilliant Period". 

Las Meninas by Diego Velázquez

Las Meninas by Diego Velázquez 

Las Meninas is a 1656 painting in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, by Diego Velázquez, the main craftsman of the Spanish Golden Age. Its perplexing and baffling organization brings up issues about the real world and deception and makes a dubious connection between the watcher and the figures portrayed. 

American Gothic by Grant Wood

American Gothic by Grant Wood 

American Gothic is a 1930 painting by Grant Wood in the gathering of the Art Institute of Chicago. Wood was motivated to paint what is currently known as the American Gothic House in Eldon, Iowa, alongside "the sort of individuals I liked should live in that house." 

A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat

A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat 

A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte painted in 1884, is Georges Seurat's most renowned work. It is a main case of the pointillist system, executed on an enormous canvas. Seurat's arrangement incorporates various Parisians at a recreation center on the banks of the River Seine. 

Guernica by Pablo Picasso

Guernica by Pablo Picasso 

Guernica is an enormous oil painting on canvas by Spanish craftsman Pablo Picasso finished in June 1937. Presently in the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid, the dark, dark, and white painting was done at Picasso's home in Paris.

The Night Watch by Rembrandt

The Night Watch by Rembrandt 

Local army Company of District II under the Command of Captain Frans Banninck Cocq, otherwise called The Shooting Company of Frans Banning Cocq and Willem van Ruytenburch, however usually alluded to as The Night Watch, is a 1642 painting by Rembrandt van Rijn. 

Café Terrace at Night by Vincent van Gogh

Café Terrace at Night by Vincent van Gogh 

Bistro Terrace at Night is an 1888 oil painting by the Dutch craftsman Vincent van Gogh. It is otherwise called The Cafe Terrace on the Place du Forum, and, when originally displayed in 1891, was entitled Coffeehouse, at night. Van Gogh painted Café Terrace at Night in Arles, France, in mid-September 1888.

Whistler's Mother by James Abbott McNeill Whistler

Whistler's Mother by James Abbott McNeill Whistler 

The Gray and Black No.1, best known under its everyday name Whistler's Mother, is a sketch in oils on canvas made by the American-conceived painter James McNeill Whistler in 1871. The subject of the depiction is Whistler's mom, Anna McNeill Whistler.

The Sleeping Gypsy by Henri Rousseau

The Sleeping Gypsy by Henri Rousseau

The Sleeping Gypsy is an 1897 oil painting by French Naïve craftsman Henri Rousseau. It is a fantastical delineation of a lion considering over a resting lady on a twilight night. Rousseau previously displayed the depiction at the thirteenth Salon des Indépendants and attempted fruitlessly to offer it to the city hall leader of the place where he grew up, Laval.

 

Bal du moulin de la Galette by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Bal du moulin de la Galette by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Bal du moulin de la Galette is an 1876 painting by French craftsman Pierre-Auguste Renoir. It is housed at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris and is one of Impressionism's most commended showstoppers. The work of art portrays a run of the mill Sunday evening at the first Moulin de la Galette in the area of Montmartre in Paris.

 

Impression, Sunrise by Claude Monet

Impression, Sunrise by Claude Monet 

Impression, Sunrise is a sketch by Claude Monet previously appeared at what might end up known as the "Display of the Impressionists" in Paris on April 1874. The depiction is credited with moving the name of the Impressionist development. Impression, Sunrise delineates the port of Le Havre, Monet's main residence. 

The Third of May 1808 by Francisco Goya

The Third of May 1808 by Francisco Goya

The Third of May 1808 is a work of art finished in 1814 by the Spanish painter Francisco Goya, presently in the Museo del Prado, Madrid. In the work, Goya tried to recognize Spanish protection from Napoleon's armed forces during the control of 1808 in the Peninsular War.

Liberty Leading the People by Eugène DelacroixLiberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix


Liberty Leading the People is a work of art by Eugène Delacroix celebrating the July Revolution of 1830, which toppled King Charles X of France.

Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe by Édouard Manet 

Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe by Édouard Manet 

Le Déjeuner sur l'herbe – initially titled Le Bain – is an enormous oil on canvas painting by Édouard Manet made in 1862 and 1863. It delineates a female bare and a sparsely dressed female bather on a cookout with two completely dressed men in a provincial setting. 

Lady with an Ermine by Leonardo da Vinci

Lady with an Ermine by Leonardo da Vinci

Lady with an Ermine is a work of art by Italian craftsman Leonardo da Vinci from around 1489–1490 and one of Poland's national fortunes. The representation's subject is Cecilia Gallerani, painted when she was the special lady of Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan, and Leonardo was in the Duke's administration.

The Raft of the Medusa by Théodore Géricault

The Raft of the Medusa by Théodore Géricault

The Raft of the Medusa – initially titled Scène de Naufrage – is an oil painting of 1818–19 by the French Romantic painter and lithographer Théodore Géricault. Finished when the craftsman was 27, the work has turned into a symbol of French Romanticism.

Nighthawks by Edward Hopper

Nighthawks by Edward Hopper

Nighthawks is a 1942 oil on canvas painting by Edward Hopper that depicts individuals in a downtown coffee shop late during the evening as saw through the burger joint's enormous glass window. Additionally depicted are the outsides of the urban structures over the road from the burger joint.

Luncheon of the Boating Party by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Luncheon of the Boating Party by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Luncheon of the Boating Party is a work of art by French impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Incorporated into the Seventh Impressionist Exhibition in 1882, it was distinguished as the best painting in the show by three pundits.

Napoleon Crossing the Alps by Jacques-Louis David

Napoleon Crossing the Alps by Jacques-Louis David

Napoleon Crossing the Alps is the title given to the five variants of an oil on canvas equestrian picture of Napoleon Bonaparte painted by the French craftsman Jacques-Louis David somewhere in the range of 1801 and 1805.

View of Toledo by El Greco

View of Toledo by El Greco

View of Toledo is one of the two enduring scenes painted by El Greco. The other, View and Plan of Toledo, is in plain view at the Museo de El Greco in Toledo. Perspective on Toledo is among the best-known delineations of the sky in Western craftsmanship, alongside Vincent van Gogh's The Starry Night and the scenes of J. M. W.

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee by Rembrandt

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee by Rembrandt

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee is a 1633 painting by the Dutch Golden Age painter Rembrandt van Rijn. It was beforehand in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, yet it was stolen in 1990 and stays missing.

The Harvesters by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

 The Harvesters by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

Bruegel's pomp for the regular man is viewed as one of the characterizing works of Western art. This arrangement was one of six made on the subject of the seasons. The time is most likely early September. A gathering of workers on the left cut and packaged wheat, while on the right, another gathering takes their late morning feast. One figure is gotten some sleep under a tree with his jeans unfastened. This meticulousness proceeds all through the painting as a parade of ever-granular perceptions retreating into space. It was uncommon for when scenes served for the most part as sceneries for strict paintings. 

The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck

 The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck

One of the most noteworthy works created during the Northern Renaissance, this organization is accepted to be one of the first paintings executed in quite a while. A full-length twofold representation, it supposedly depicts an Italian dealer and a lady who might be his lady of the hour. In 1934, the commended art student of history Erwin Panofsky recommended that the painting is really a wedding contract. What can be dependably said is that the piece is one of the main delineations of an inside utilizing a symmetrical point of view to make a feeling of a room that appears to be adjoining with the watcher's own; it feels like a painting you could step into.

The Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch

The Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch

This fantastical triptych is commonly viewed as a far off herald to Surrealism. In truth, it's the statement of a late medieval artist who accepted that God and the Devil, Heaven and Hell were genuine. Of the three scenes delineated, the left board demonstrates Christ showing Eve to Adam, while the correct one highlights the plunders of Hell; less clear is whether the inside board portrays Heaven. In Bosch's perfervid vision of Hell, a colossal arrangement of ears using a phallic blade assaults the accursed, while a winged animal curved bug ruler with a chamber pot for a crown sits on its position of authority, eating up the destined before immediately crapping them out once more. This uproar of imagery has been to a great extent impenetrable to translation, which may represent it across the board advance.

Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso

The ur-canvas of twentieth-century art, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon introduced the advanced time by conclusively breaking with the authentic convention of Western painting, fusing suggestions to the African veils that Picasso had found in Paris' ethnographic gallery at the Palais du Trocadro. Its compositional DNA likewise incorporates El Greco's The Vision of Saint John (1608–14), presently hanging in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The ladies being portrayed are really whores in a whorehouse in the artist's local Barcelona. 

The Naked Maja by Francisco de Goya y Lucientes

The Naked Maja by Francisco de Goya y Lucientes

Certainly OK with herself, this female naked gazing unashamedly at the watcher created a significant ruckus when it was painted, and even got Goya into high temp water with the Spanish Inquisition. In addition to other things, it highlights one of the primary portrayals of open hair in Western art. Dispatched by Manuel de Godoy, Spain's Prime Minister, The Naked Maja was joined by another adaptation with the sitter dressed. The personality of the lady stays a secret, however, she is mostly an idea to be Godoy's young special lady, Pepita Tudó.

The Creation Of Adam by Michelangelo

The Creation Of Adam by Michelangelo

The Creation of Adam is without a doubt the one which has most profoundly dazzled successors. No big surprise, for here we are given a solitary overpowering vision of the sublimity of God and the potential respectability of man remarkable and unparalleled in the whole history of visual art. The beginning tells how the Lord made Adam from the residue of the earth and inhaled into his noses the breath of life. This story is never delineated actually in Renaissance art. 

Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 by Marcel Duchamp

Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 by Marcel Duchamp

A complex blend of Cubism and Futurism, Duchamp's delineation of the main subject in different presentation brings out development through time just as space and was roused by the photographic movement investigations of Eadweard Muybridge and Étienne-Jules Marey. Nude was one of a bunch of paintings Duchamp made before turning full time towards the conceptualist tests, (for example, the Readymades and The Large Glass) for which he's known. 

Grande Odalisque by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres

Grande Odalisque by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres

Authorized by Napoleon's sister, Queen Caroline Murat of Naples, Grande Odalisque spoke to the artist's break with the Neo-old style he'd been related to for quite a bit of his profession. The work could be depicted as Mannerist, however, it's, for the most part, thought of as a change to Romanticism, a development that renounced Neo-classicalism's exactness, convention, and equipoise for inspiring passionate responses from the watcher. This delineation of a mistress listlessly presented on a lounge chair is outstanding for her unusual extents. Anatomically off base, this cryptic, uncanny figure was welcomed with sneers by pundits at the time, however, it, in the end, wound up one of Ingres' most suffering works. 

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog by Caspar David Friedrich

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog by Caspar David Friedrich

Wanderer Above The Sea Of Fog Analysis

The love of nature, or all the more absolutely, the sentiment of wonder it propelled, was a mark of the Romantic style in art, and there is no preferred model on that score over this picture of an explorer in the mountains, stopping on a rough outcrop to take in his environment. His back is turned towards the watcher as though he were excessively enchanted with the scene to pivot, however, his posture offers a sort of over-the-shoulder see that draws us into vista as though we were seeing it through his eyes. 

The Swing by Jean-Honoré Fragonard

The Swing by Jean-Honoré Fragonard

Jean-Honoré Fragonard's The Swing was basically a commission gone to him by another painter Gabriel-François Doyen. The painting's storyline and the arrangement was proposed to Doyen by a courteous fellow of the court, who needed a painting of him and his fancy woman. The definite character of the supporter is obscure, however, he was one after another idea to have been the Baron de Saint-Julien, the Receiver General of the French Clergy, which would have disclosed the solicitation to incorporate a diocesan pushing the swing. Gabriel Doyen declined the commission and rather passed it on to Fragonard who expelled any references to explicit individuals however kept the idea of the first proposition.

A Cotton Office In New Orleans by Edgar Degas

A Cotton Office In New Orleans by Edgar Degas

This painting depicts his uncle's cotton financier business when it failed during a monetary accident. Here, Degas' Uncle, Musson, is seen grabbing the nature of crude cotton, while Degas' sibling Achille is leaning against a window at the left. His sibling Rene is perusing a paper while a few other individuals approach their exercises. Degas had gone with his sibling Rene in late 1872 from Europe to New Orleans to visit his uncle Michael Musson. Degas was to venture out back to Europe in January 1873 yet his outing was postponed.

Irises by Vincent van Gogh

Irises by Vincent van Gogh

Irises are maybe the primary subject he did in the refuge. It went before his first assault there and from the start, look shows no clear hint of the ill humor and high pressure that show up in a significant number of the later works. He paints the blossoms with profound respect and happiness. The abundance of components in this nearby stuffed picture is restrained and requested for the eye without loss of opportunity by the division of the canvas into genuinely particular, enormous districts of shading moving toward evenness: the virus leaf-green in the center, the iris-blue above and underneath, and in two corners the red ground and the removed warm green, contacted with yellow, orange, and white. Every district has its own trademark shapes and spotting, and all are glowing.

A Bar at the Folies-Bergère by Édouard Manet

A Bar at the Folies-Bergère by Édouard Manet

The painting is the climax of his enthusiasm for scenes of urban recreation and display, a subject that he had created in discourse with Impressionism over the earlier decade. The painting is a magnum opus that has bewildered and enlivened artists and researchers since it was covered up 100 years back. The Folies-Bergère was one of the most intricate theatrical presentation scenes in Paris, exhibiting amusement running from ballet performances to carnival acts. Another fascination was the barmaids, who were expected by numerous contemporary spectators to be accessible as surreptitious whores.

Composition viii by Wassily Kandinsky

Composition viii by Wassily Kandinsky

In this work circles, triangles, and straight components make a surface of cooperating geometric structures. The significance of circles in this painting anticipates the prevailing job they would play in numerous ensuing works. Kandinsky expected to detail a theoretical language that would make compelling feelings in the group of spectators a huge degree a similar route as it does the music.

The Scream by Edvard Munch

The Scream by Edvard Munch

The Scream is personal, an expressionistic development dependent on Munch's genuine encounter of a scream penetrating through nature while on a stroll, after his two sidekicks, found out of sight, had left him. Fitting the way that the sound more likely than not been heard when his psyche was in an irregular state, Munch renders it in a style which whenever pushed to limits can annihilate human uprightness. As recently noticed, the streaming bends of art nouveau speak to an emotional straight combination forced upon nature, whereby the variety of particulars is bound together into a totality of natural proposal with ladylike suggestions.

Paris Street In Rainy Weather by Gustave Caillebotte

Paris Street In Rainy Weather by Gustave Caillebotte

Caillebotte strikingly caught a huge, unmistakable innovation, complete with life-size figures walking around the frontal area and wearing the most popular trends. The painting's exceptionally created surface, thorough point of view, and terrific scale satisfied Parisian spectators acclimated with the scholarly stylish of the official Salon. Then again, its hilter kilter synthesis, strangely trimmed structures, downpour washed state of mind, and truly contemporary subject invigorated increasingly extreme reasonableness. Consequently, the painting commanded the observed Impressionist presentation of 1877, to a great extent sorted out by the artist himself.

Boreas by John William Waterhouse

Boreas by John William Waterhouse

The striking portrait includes a little youngster cleared by the breeze as her draperies in record and blue tones are blown into movement. The painting is set in a spring scene with pink blooms and yellow daffodils. The captivating painting is named after Boreas, the Greek divine force of the north wind. For over 90 years, Boreas was lost until it reappeared during the 1990s when it was set available to be purchased. Boreas mirrors the Pre-Raphaelite style put on the map by a gathering of English painters during the Victoria period. Established in 1848, the gathering included William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and James Collinson.

Branches with Almond Blossom by Vincent van Gogh

Branches with Almond Blossom by Vincent van Gogh

Almond branches are a subject that Van Gogh visited a couple of times previously. In prior examinations, he painted cut branches set in a jar – as a still life. In this image, Blossoming Almond Tree, for his nephew, he paints an altogether different arrangement. Rather than visiting the still life once more, he shows white almond tree branches against a blue sky. It isn't demonstrated whether these branches are cut from the tree and sitting in a container outside of the perspective on the watcher or on the off chance that they are still on the tree, seen from beneath turning upward towards the sky. It is an unordinary creation for both art overall and for Van Gogh himself.

Lady Godiva by John Maler Collier

Lady Godiva by John Maler Collier

Lady Godiva is an 1898 painting by English artist John Collier, who worked in the style of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. The depiction of Lady Godiva and her notable ride through Coventry, England, is held in Coventry's Herbert Art Gallery and Museum. Lady Godiva was an eleventh-century Anglo-Saxon aristocrat who, as per a legend dating in any event to the thirteenth century, rode exposed – canvassed uniquely in her long hair – through the lanes of Coventry to increase a reduction of the abusive tax assessment that her significant other forced on his inhabitants. The name "Peeping Tom" for a voyeur starts from later forms of this legend in which a man named Tom watched her ride and was struck visually impaired or dead. 

Salvator Mundi by Leonardo da Vinci

Salvator Mundi by Leonardo da Vinci

Salvator Mundi is a painting by Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci dated to c. 1500. Since quite a while ago idea to be a duplicate of a lost unique hidden with overpainting, it was rediscovered, reestablished, and incorporated into a significant Leonardo show at the National Gallery, London, in 2011–12. Albeit a few driving researchers have believed it to be a unique work by Leonardo, this attribution has been contested by different masters, some of whom set that he just contributed certain components. The painting portrays Jesus in Renaissance dress, making the indication of the cross with his correct hand, while holding a straightforward, non-refracting precious stone circle in his left, flagging his job as Salvator Mundi (Latin for 'Friend in need of the World') and speaking to the 'celestial sphere' of the sky.

Champ de Mars: The Red Tower by Robert Delaunay

Champ de Mars: The Red Tower by Robert Delaunay

One of the numerous artists to delineate the milestone, Delaunay did a progression of Eiffel Tower paintings, of which the Art Institute's model is among the best known. The artist implanted the dynamism of present-day life into this picture by utilizing different perspectives, cadenced fracture of structure, and solid shading contrasts. Delaunay complemented the structure's transcending nearness by encircling it with tall structures and setting littler, shorter structures, seen from above, at its base. The highest point of the pinnacle appears to take off, its huge structure enlarged by winglike mists and fixes of the light-filled sky.

Among the Ruins by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

Among the Ruins by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

Alma-Tadema's works are momentous for the manner by which blooms, surfaces, and hard reflecting substances, similar to metals, earthenware, and particularly marble, are painted – surely, his reasonable delineation of marble drove him to be known as the 'sublime painter'. His work shows a great part of the fine execution and splendid shade of the old Dutch bosses. By the human enthusiasm with which he permeates every one of his scenes from old life he brings them inside the extent of present-day feeling and charms us with delicate conclusion and energy.

Color Study, Squares with Concentric Rings by Wassily Kandinsky

Color Study, Squares with Concentric Rings by Wassily Kandinsky

Squares with Concentric Circles, maybe, Kandinsky's most unmistakable work, isn't really an undeniable picture. This drawing is a little report on how unique shading mixes are seen that the painter utilized in his inventive procedure as a helpful material. For Kandinsky, shading implied something other than a visual part of an image. Shading is its spirit. In his books, he depicted his own point of view on how hues associated with one another and with the observer in detail and idyllically. In addition, Kandinsky was a synaesthete, for example, he could 'hear hues' and 'see sounds.' So, this is presumably honorable that following century, it isn't one of his structures – which he himself considered as his fundamental accomplishments – yet this little drawing has turned out to be one of Kandinsky's most prominent works.

Stag Night At Sharkeys by George Bellows

Stag Night At Sharkeys by George Bellows

Stag at Sharkey's is a 1909 oil painting by George Wesley Bellows delineating two fighters battling in the private athletic club arranged opposite his studio. It is part of the Ashcan School development known in particular for portraying scenes of day by day life in mid-twentieth-century New York City, regularly in the city's less fortunate neighborhoods. Cries utilized speedy strokes to make an obscured picture, reproducing the two warriors moving. He likewise picked a depressed spot of view to put the watcher among the group watching the battle.

The Great Wave Off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai

The Great Wave Off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai

The amazing arrangement of this woodblock print said to have propelled Debussy's La Mer (The Sea) and Rilke's Der Berg (The Mountain), guarantees its notoriety for being a symbol of world art. Hokusai keenly played with the point of view to cause Japan's most fabulous mountain to show up as a little triangular hill inside the empty of the peaking wave. The artist wound up acclaimed for his scenes made utilizing a palette of indigo and imported Prussian blue.

Interchange by Willem de Kooning

Interchange by Willem de Kooning

Exchange likewise addresses a specialized change in the manner de Kooning painted. It was painted when he worked intimately with Franz Kline. The two painters had notable individual styles. Kline was known for instinctive, speedy brush strokes and a high contrast palette. De Kooning was known for viciously assaulting his canvases, pushing his brushes so significantly against them that he would regularly cut their surfaces. He would likewise work his paintings more than once, over long ranges of time, scratching the paint away and including more layers, giving them a feeling that they were at the same time exhausted but then never wrapped up. Kline and de Kooning impacted each other in manners that advanced both of their styles. Kline started adding shading to his paintings, motivated by de Kooning, and de Kooning started fusing strategies progressively suggestive of Kline's instinctive, immediately made gestural imprints. Trade is a prime early case of the subsequent tasteful and textural move de Kooning experienced in the mid-1950s.

Breezing Up also known as A Fair Wind by Winslow Homer

Breezing Up also known as A Fair Wind by Winslow Homer

Homer started this painting from a watercolor sketch he had done, when visiting in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Picking the sketch which most took after the result he wanted, he re-painted the sketch in oils, changing the piece fairly, and was propelled to overhaul the watercolor sketch by the areas of the Massachusetts coast. Today, it is viewed as Homer's best notorious, American painting, and is housed at the National Gallery of Art, in Washington D.C.

Wheat Field with Cypresses at the Haude Galline near Eygalieres by Vincent van Gogh

Wheat Field with Cypresses at the Haude Galline near Eygalieres by Vincent van Gogh

Cypresses made progress in Van Gogh's work by late June 1889 when he set out to give one of his first arrangement in Saint-Rémy to the transcending trees. Particular for their rich impasto, his extravagant on-the-spot studies incorporate the Met's nearby vertical perspective on cypresses (49.30) and this superb even organization, which he represented in reed-pen drawings sent to his sibling on July 2. Van Gogh viewed the present work as one of his "best" summer scenes and was provoked that September to make two studio interpretations: one on a similar scale (National Gallery, London) and the other a little copy, planned as a present for his mom and sister (private accumulation).

A Friend In Need by Cassius Marcellus Coolidge

A Friend In Need by Cassius Marcellus Coolidge

Dogs Playing Poker by Cassius Marcellus Coolidge alludes to one painting, yet 18 of them! The arrangement incorporates the artist's unique Poker Game (1894) painting, alongside 16 other oil paintings authorized in 1903 by Brown and Bigelow to publicize stogies and an extra 1910 painting. Each of the eighteen of these paintings highlight silly acculturated dogs; be that as it may, just eleven of the paintings really portray poker-confronted little guys playing cards around a table.

Boulevard des Capucines by Claude Oscar Monet

Boulevard des Capucines by Claude Oscar Monet

Avenue des Capucines introduced a veritable look at Parisian life on a winter day, and the pundit Ernest Chesneau guaranteed that Monet caught the subtle nature of development with exceptional expertise. The painting catches a scene of the rushing about of Parisian life from the studio of Monet's companion, the picture taker Felix Nadar. Applying almost no detail, Monet uses short, brisk brushstrokes to make the "impression" of individuals in the city bursting at the seams with development. Pundit Leroy was not satisfied with these preoccupied groups, depicting them as "dark tongue-lickings."

Dancers Bending Down, also known as The Ballerinas by Edgar Degas

Dancers Bending Down, also known as The Ballerinas by Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas is particularly related to the subjects of the dance, and over a large portion of his works delineate artists. These showcase his dominance in the portrayal of development, as do his racecourse subjects and female nudes. His representations are viewed as among the best throughout the entire existence of art.

Dante And Virgil In Hell by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Dante And Virgil In Hell by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Dante and Virgil is an 1850 oil on canvas painting by William-Adolphe Bouguereau. It is by and by in plain view at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. The painting portrays Dante and Virgil looking on as two condemned spirits are weaved in battle. One of the spirits is a chemist and blasphemer named Capocchio. In this delineation, Capocchio is being nibbled on the neck by Gianni Schicchi who had utilized misrepresentation to guarantee another man's legacy.

Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose by John Singer Sargent

Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose by John Singer Sargent

The motivation for this image came during a drifting endeavor Sargent took on the Thames at Pangbourne in September 1885, with the American artist Edwin Austin Abbey, during which he saw Chinese lights hanging among trees and lilies. He started the image while remaining at the home of the painter F.D. Millet at Broadway, Worcestershire, not long after his transition to Britain from Paris. From the outset, he utilized the Millets' five-year-old little girl Katharine as his model, yet she was before long supplanted by Polly and Dorothy (Dolly) Barnard, the girls of the artist Frederick Barnard on the grounds that they had the careful hair shading Sargent was looking for. Dolly, matured eleven, is on the left; Polly, matured seven, is on the right.

When Will You Marry? by Paul Gauguin

When Will You Marry? by Paul Gauguin

a younger lady in customary dress stretches forward on the ground. She is thinking back towards and partially darkening, an all the more motherly figure in a western-style dress who lifts her hand in a motion of importance. The bloom behind the young lady's ear is a customary Tahitian image by which nubile ladies signal accessibility for marriage. At the foot of the picture is an engraving in Tahitian: "NAFEA Faa ipoipo", which deciphers as: "When will you marry?" Many of Gauguin's paintings from this time bore engravings in the language. The enticing exotic nature of the lady is passed on by the splendid level hues which Gauguin typically utilized at this period. The style is to some degree innocent, with the disentangled diagrams he used to pass on his optimal of crude art.

The Oath Of Horatii by Jacques-Louis David

The Oath Of Horatii by Jacques-Louis David

It portrays three men, siblings, saluting toward three swords held up by their dad as the ladies behind him lament—nobody had ever observed a painting like it. Comparable subjects had consistently been found in the Salons previously yet the physicality and extreme feeling of the painting was new and verifiable.

Flaming June by Frederic Leighton

Flaming June by Frederic Leighton

Blazing June is a painting by Sir Frederic Leighton, delivered in 1895. Painted with oil paints on a 47-by-47-inch square canvas, it is generally viewed as Leighton's showstopper, indicating his classicist nature. It is imagined that the lady depicted suggests the figures of dozing sprites and naiads the Greeks regularly etched.

Annunciation by Leonardo Da Vinci

Annunciation by Leonardo Da Vinci

Critically certain parts of the painting, for example, the creation, the Archangel Gabriel and the scenes are unadulterated da Vinci yet concession to numerous parts of attributions stay a long way from consistent. A few subtleties of the painting, for example, the wings of the blessed messenger, have been repainted by another hand and the marble stone casket has been duplicated from a cutting by Leonardo's lord, Andrea del Verrocchio.

The Avenue In The Rain by Childe Hassam

The Avenue In The Rain by Childe Hassam

The Avenue in the Rain is a 1917 oil painting by the American Impressionist painter Childe Hassam. It portrays Fifth Avenue in New York City in the downpour, hung with US banners. The painting is one of six works by Hassam in the changeless art accumulation of the White House in Washington DC.

Dance at Bougival by Pierre Auguste Renoir

Dance at Bougival by Pierre Auguste Renoir

The young lady and her partner are disconnected from their environment. Their association with one another is delicate and shameless. Indeed, even the most easygoing look uncovers that the man venerates the young lady. We see it in the pressure of his hand as he controls himself from crushing her fingers too firmly, and in the watchfulness with which he guides her into a turn, practically cumbersome with warm fixation. Also, the young lady, her body curved in the balanced at this point yielding an example of the move, turns her head and turns away - timidly enchanted with the delight she motivates in her buddy and herself.

Still Life with Irises by Vincent van Gogh

Still Life with Irises by Vincent van Gogh

Container with Irises Against a Yellow Background stands apart as one of Vincent van Gogh's most outstanding botanical still life paintings. The work, alongside its partner piece Still Life: Vase with Irises, is strange in that it's one of only a handful couple of still lifes painted by Van Gogh during his stay at the refuge in Saint-Rémy. Van Gogh painted still life works all through his ten-year profession as an artist- - from the soonest works in Etten.

Battle Of Issus by Albrecht Altdorfer

Battle Of Issus by Albrecht Altdorfer

This is the most renowned painting of Altdorfer. Its subject is the triumph of the youthful Alexander the Great in 333 B.C. over the Persian armed force of King Darius III in the skirmish of Issus. Issus was an old town in southeast Asia Minor close to present-day Iskenderun, Turkey. The fight, actually, occurred in Turkey, in any case, on this painting it appears in the rough condition of the Alps with German urban areas out of sight. 

The Lady Of Shalott by John William Waterhouse

The Lady Of Shalott by John William Waterhouse

recounts a lady who endures under an undisclosed revile. She lives segregated in a pinnacle on an island called Shalott, on a waterway that streams down from King Arthur's manor at Camelot. Not setting out to view reality, she is permitted to see the outside world just through its appearance in a mirror. One day she witnesses the reflected picture of the attractive knight Lancelot, and can't avoid taking a gander at him legitimately.

The Boat Trip by Mary Cassatt

The Boat Trip by Mary Cassatt

This strong arrangement uncovers the impact of the level, designed surfaces, improved shading, and surprising edges of Japanese prints, which delighted in a colossal vogue in Paris in the late 1800s. The dull figure of the man packs the image onto the level plane of the canvas, and the skyline is pushed to the top, falling a feeling of separation. Our higher vantage point gives us a sideways view of the vessel. Its structure is isolated into beautifying shapes by the convergence of its level backings.

Boulevard Montmartre Spring by Camille Pissarro

Boulevard Montmartre Spring by Camille Pissarro

In the wake of going through six years in country Eragny, Pissarro came back to Paris, where he painted a few arrangements of the grands roads. Studying the view from his lodgings at the Grand Hotel de Russie.

Sailboat at Le Petit-Gennevilliers by Claude Oscar Monet

Sailboat at Le Petit-Gennevilliers by Claude Oscar Monet

Claude Oscar Monet painted Sailboat At Le Petit Gennevilliers in 1874, that year he joined other present-day artists to cooperate in the locale of Paris.

Nu couché by Amedeo Modigliani

Nu couché by Amedeo Modigliani

Nu couché additionally referred to in English as Red Nude or Reclining Nude is a 1917 oil on canvas painting by the Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani. It is one of his most generally replicated and displayed paintings. The painting acknowledged $170,405,000 at Christie's New York deal on 9 November 2015, a record for a Modigliani painting and setting it high among the most costly paintings at any point sold.

The Night Cafe by Vincent van Gogh

The Night Cafe by Vincent van Gogh

The painting was executed on a modernly prepared canvas of size 30 (French standard). It delineates the inside of the bistro, with a half-curtained entryway in the middle foundation driving, apparently, to progressively private quarters. Five clients sit at tables along with the dividers to one side and right, and a server in a light coat, to the other side of a billiard table close to the focal point of the room, stands to confront the watcher.

The Walk, Woman with a Parasol by Claude Oscar Monet

The Walk, Woman with a Parasol by Claude Oscar Monet

With Manet's help, Monet discovered a cabin in rural Argenteuil in late 1871, a move that started one of the richest periods of his vocation. Impressionism advanced in the late 1860s from a craving to make full–scale, multi-figure portrayals of customary individuals in easygoing outside circumstances. At its most flawless, impressionism was receptive to scene painting, a subject Monet favored.

A Moorish Bath (also known as Turkish Woman Bathing) by Jean-Léon Gérôme

A Moorish Bath(also known as Turkish Woman Bathing) by Jean-Léon Gérôme

Among the most industrially fruitful artists of the nineteenth century, Gérôme fabricated his notoriety for being an Orientalist, painting scenes of a nonexistent spot that joined qualities of North Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean with his own dreams and creations. Here Gérôme managed his watcher a look into the private universe of a lady's shower, a scene he doubtlessly never saw. The pale, red-headed bare—maybe intended to recommend a subjugated Circassian lady from the furthest reaches of the Ottoman Empire—frames a striking complexity to her African chaperon in the sun-dappled inside of an Islamic bathhouse.

Portrait of Madame de Florian by Giovanni Boldini

Portrait of Madame de Florian by Giovanni Boldini

Among the numerous paintings found in the apartment was a representation portraying Marthe de Florian herself in a wonderful pink muslin nightdress, painted by one of her darlings, the artist Giovanni Boldini. The picture had never been recorded, shown or distributed, anyway, a meeting card with a jotted love note from the painter was found in the apartment, and a short reference found in a book from 1951 dispatched by the artist's widow Emilia Cardona likewise affirmed the provenance of the painting.

The Beach at Trouville by Claude Oscar Monet

The Beach at Trouville by Claude Oscar Monet

French Impressionism was principally worried about the catch on canvas of 'minutes' or 'impressions' of daylight and shading, which required dominance of Plein air painting or portraying in oils.

The Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse

The Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse

Supernatural occurrences, enchantment and the intensity of prediction are normal topics in Waterhouse's art. All the more explicitly, the idea of lady as a sorcerer is one that repeats in pictures, for example, Circe Offering the Cup to Ulysees and Hylas and the Nymphs. The lady in this image seems, by all accounts, to be a witch or priestess, enriched with enchantment powers, perhaps the influence of prediction.

Masterpiece by Roy Lichtenstein

 Masterpiece by Roy Lichtenstein

Masterpiece is viewed as a whimsical joke that reflects upon Lichtenstein's own vocation. All things considered, the joke is considered "clever but then frightfully perceptive" in light of the fact that it predicted a portion of things to come disturbance that the artist would persevere.

The Hireling Shepherd by William Holman Hunt

The Hireling Shepherd by William Holman Hunt

This startling picture isn't just outwardly capturing, however maybe topical nowadays, given the ongoing open dialog about savage conduct by men. In the image, a youngster, obviously expected to watch out for the sheep behind him, is rather making the proceeds onward a young lady.

The Tower Of Babel by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

The Tower Of Babel by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

Leutze's delineation of Washington's assault on the Hessians at Trenton on December 25, 1776, was an extraordinary accomplishment in America and in Germany. Leutze started his first form of this subject in 1849. It was harmed in his studio by fire in 1850 and, in spite of the fact that reestablished and gained by the Bremen Kunsthalle, was again wrecked in a besieging strike in 1942. In 1850, Leutze started this variant of the subject, which was put on a show in New York during October of 1851.

The Gleaners by Jean-Francois Millet

The Gleaners by Jean-Francois Millet

Portrays the development of the Tower of Babel, which, as per the Book of Genesis in the Bible, was worked by bound together, monolingual humankind as a sign of their accomplishment and to keep them from dispersing.

The Card Players by Paul Cézanne

The Card Players by Paul Cézanne

Cézanne deliberately made this organization from figure examines he had made of nearby farmhands. When he had perplexed out his origination, he kept on fining tune the postures and places of the players, until they—like the four funnels holding tight the divider behind them—each became all-good.

Fishing boats on the Beach at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer by Vincent van Gogh

Fishing boats on the Beach at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer by Vincent van Gogh

Contrasted with the unpredictable surface of the sandy seashore, they've been painted in an excessively two-dimensional way. The vessels are comprised of zones of uniform shading inside solid diagrams. Besides, the pontoons don't cast shadows on the seashore. These elaborate components were well-known to Van Gogh from his gathering of Japanese prints. Van Gogh would have liked to make this painting on the seashore, however, he couldn't on the grounds that the anglers put out to ocean early every morning. He drew the pontoons there, be that as it may, and later made this painting at home.

A Wooded Path In Autumn by Hans Andersen Brendekilde

A Wooded Path In Autumn by Hans Andersen Brendekilde

A Wooded Path in Autumn is a delightful painting by Hans Andersen Brendekilde. Hans Andersen was a Danish painter destined for a poor family. As a youngster, he was apprenticed to an artist in Odense.

Spanish Dancer by John Singer Sargent

Spanish Dancer by John Singer Sargent

El Jaleo is a huge painting by John Singer Sargent, delineating a Spanish Gypsy artist performing to the backup of artists. The painting was motivated by a five-month trip Sargent made through Spain and North Africa in 1879.

A Mermaid by John William Waterhouse

A Mermaid by John William Waterhouse

Waterhouse was likewise intrigued by the darker folklore of the mermaid as a sorcerer. Mermaids generally were alarms who baited mariners to their demise through their enrapturing tune. They were likewise sad figures as mermaids couldn't get by in the human world which they longed for and men couldn't exist in their watery domain, so any relationship was damned.

The Orange Trees by Gustave Caillebotte

The Orange Trees by Gustave Caillebotte

With splendid shades of reds, greens, purples, and yellows set down in the gleaming brushwork run of the mill of Impressionism, Gustave Caillebotte has caught the quite present-day topic of refined relaxation exercises. In "The Orange Trees," Caillebotte's sibling Martial and their young cousin Zoe, both richly dressed, unwind in the recreation center like a nursery of the family manor at Yerres, only outside of Paris.

Summer Evening at Skagen by Peder Severin Kroyer

Summer Evening at Skagen by Peder Severin Kroyer

A standout amongst others referred to of the artistic network known as the Skagen Painters. The work shows Marie Krøyer, the artist's better half, remaining on the seashore at Skagen with their canine Rap next to her and the twilight reflected in the ocean.

The Siesta by Paul Gauguin

The Siesta by Paul Gauguin

The unaffected beauty and collective simplicity of Tahitian ladies dazzled Gauguin colossally. The artist took a shot at this painting over an all-inclusive period, joining various changes. The skirt of the lady in the frontal area, for instance, was initially brilliant red; there was a canine in the position currently involved by the crate at lower right, and the lady situated at the left edge of the patio was recently arranged further to one side. 

The Birth of Venus by Alexandre Cabanel

The Birth of Venus by Alexandre Cabanel

The Birth of Venus was one of the great triumphs of the 1863 Salon where it was purchased by Napoleon III for his private gathering. Cabanel, a painter who got various awards all through his career, around then played an important job in teaching at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and in running the Salon. Typical of his virtuoso strategy, this painting is an ideal example of the popular and official artistic taste of the period.

Dance Class by Edgar Degas

Dance Class by Edgar Degas

This work and its variant in the Musée d'Orsay, Paris, speak to the most ambitious paintings Degas gave to the theme of the dance. Some twenty-four ladies, ballerinas, and their mothers wait while a dancer executes an "attitude" for her examination. Jules Perrot, a famous ballet master, leads the class. The imaginary scene is set in a rehearsal room in the old Paris Opéra, which had as of late caught fire.

The Kiss by Francesco Paolo Hayez

The Kiss by Francesco Paolo Hayez

It is potentially his best-known work. This painting passes on the main features of Italian Romanticism and has come to speak to the soul of the Risorgimento. It was charged by Alfonso Maria Visconti di Saliceto, who donated to the Pinacoteca di Brera after his death.

Echo and Narcissus by John William Waterhouse

Echo and Narcissus by John William Waterhouse

Echo and Narcissus is in the class of classical folklore. In Ovid's variant of the legend, Narcissus was the child of the stream god Cephissus and the sprite Liriope. His parents were informed that he would live to a mature age on the off chance that he didn't take a gander at himself. He dismissed all the sprites and ladies who began to look all starry eyed at him.

Dempsey and Firpo, also known as Brodie's Revenge by George Wesley Bellows

Dempsey and Firpo, also known as Brodie's Revenge by George Wesley Bellows

Dempsey and Firpo, one of George Bellows' most ambitious paintings, captures a pivotal minute in the September 14, 1923 prizefight between American heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey and his Argentine rival Luis Angel Firpo.

Oarsmen by Gustave Caillebotte

Oarsmen by Gustave Caillebotte

Oarsmen offers an image of the game including a moderate level of effort: two men in standard boating attire, pullovers, and straw hats are demonstrated paddling, in a durable boat; one man's face is covered up and the other's is just vaguely delineated, which obliges the watcher to concentrate on the two pairs of arms, images of exertion and development.

The Abduction of Psyche by William Bouguereau

The Abduction of Psyche by William Bouguereau

It delineates the angel Cupid carrying Psique, the mythical Greek goddess, in his arms. It has a place with a private accumulation and isn't at present on open display.

Patroclus by Jacques-Louis David

Patroclus by Jacques-Louis David

The most celebrated French artist of his day and a principal example of the late eighteenth century Neoclassical reaction against the Rococo style. David won wide acclaim with his colossal canvases on classical themes.

Head of a Woman (Female) by Leonardo da Vinci

Head of a Woman (Female) by Leonardo da Vinci

The Head of a Woman—also known as La Scapigliata—is a painting in oil on wood by the Italian Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci, dating from around c. 1508 and housed in the Galleria Nazionale di Parma, Italy.

The Floor Scrapers, also known as The Floor Strippers by Gustave Caillebotte

The Floor Scrapers, also known as The Floor Strippers by Gustave Caillebotte

The painting is an early portrayal of the urban common laborers at work. Up to this point, nearly all photos of people at work were nation scenes of farm laborers and peasants.

 Who Was Vincent Van Gogh? 

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Tags:100 Most Famous Paintings In The World [Masterpieces Of Art],A Bar at the Folies-Bergère by Édouard Manet,A Cotton Office in New Orleans by Edgar Degas,A Friend In Need by Cassius Marcellus Coolidge,A Mermaid by John William Waterhouse,A Moorish Bath(also known as Turkish Woman Bathing) by Jean-Léon Gérôme,A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat,A Wooded Path In Autumn by Hans Andersen Brendekilde,also known as Brodie's Revenge by George Wesley Bellows,also known as The Ballerinas by Edgar Degas,also known as The Floor Strippers by Gustave Caillebotte,American Gothic by Grant Wood,Among the Ruins by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema,Annunciation by Leonardo Da Vinci,Bal du moulin de la galette by Pierre-Auguste Renoir,Battle Of Issus by Albrecht Altdorfer,Boreas by John William Waterhouse,Boulevard des Capucines by Claude Oscar Monet,Boulevard Montmartre Spring by Camille Pissarro,Branches with Almond Blossom by Vincent van Gogh,Breezing Up also known as A Fair Wind by Winslow Homer,Café Terrace at Night by Vincent van Gogh,Canvas Fine Arts,Carnation Lily Lily Rose by John Singer Sargent,Champ de Mars: The Red Tower by Robert Delaunay,Color Study Squares with Concentric Rings by Wassily Kandinsky,Composition viii by Wassily Kandinsky,Dance at Bougival by Pierre Auguste Renoir,Dance Class by Edgar Degas,Dancers Bending Down,Dante And Virgil In Hell by William-Adolphe Bouguereau,Dempsey and Firpo,Echo and Narcissus by John William Waterhouse,Fishing boats on the Beach at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer by Vincent van Gogh,Flaming June by Frederic Leighton,Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer,Grande Odalisque by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres,Guernica by Pablo Picasso,Impression Sunrise by Claude Monet,Interchange by Willem de Kooning,Irises by Vincent van Gogh,Lady Godiva by John Maler Collier,Lady with an Ermine by Leonardo da Vinci,Las Meninas by Diego Velázquez,Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe by Édouard Manet,Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso,Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix,Luncheon of the Boating Party by Pierre-Auguste Renoir,Luncheon on the Grass,Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci,Napoleon Crossing the Alps by Jacques-Louis David,Nighthawks by Edward Hopper,Nu couché by Amedeo Modigliani,Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 by Marcel Duchamp,Oarsmen by Gustave Caillebotte,Paris Street In Rainy Weather by Gustave Caillebotte,Patroclus by Jacques-Louis David,Portrait of Madame de Florian by Giovanni Boldini,Sailboat at Le Petit-Gennevilliers by Claude Oscar Monet,Salvator Mundi by Leonardo da Vinci,Spanish Dancer by John Singer Sargent,Stag Night At Sharkeys by George Bellows,Still Life with Irises by Vincent van Gogh,Summer Evening at Skagen by Peder Severin Kroyer,The Abduction of Psyche by William Bouguereau,The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck,The Avenue In The Rain by Childe Hassam,The Beach at Trouville by Claude Oscar Monet,The Birth of Venus by Alexandre Cabanel,The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli,The Boat Trip by Mary Cassatt,The Card Players by Paul Cézanne,The Creation Of Adam by Michelangelo,The Floor Scrapers,The Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch,The Gleaners by Jean-Francois Millet,The Great Wave Off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai,The Harvesters by Pieter Bruegel the Elder,The Hireling Shepherd by William Holman Hunt,The Kiss by Francesco Paolo Hayez,The Kiss by Gustav Klimt,The Lady of Shalott by John William Waterhouse,The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci,The Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse,The Naked Maja by Francisco de Goya y Lucientes,The Night Cafe by Vincent van Gogh,The Night Watch by Rembrandt,The Oath Of Horatii by Jacques-Louis David,The Orange Trees by Gustave Caillebotte,The Raft of the Medusa by Théodore Géricault,The Scream by Edvard Munch,The Siesta by Paul Gauguin,The Sleeping Gypsy by Henri Rousseau,The Starry Night By Vincent Van Gogh,The Storm on the Sea of Galilee by Rembrandt,The Swing by Jean-Honoré Fragonard,The Third of May 1808 by Francisco Goya,The Tower Of Babel by Pieter Bruegel the Elder,The Walk Woman with a Parasol by Claude Oscar Monet,View of Toledo by El Greco,Wanderer above the Sea of Fog by Caspar David Friedrich,Wheat Field with Cypresses at the Haude Galline near Eygalieres by Vincent van Gogh,When Will You Marry? by Paul Gauguin,Whistler's Mother by James Abbott McNeill Whistler,Who Was Vincent Van Gogh?

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