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Top 10 Most Famous Paintings by John William Waterhouse
Dawit Abeza
Top 10 Most Famous Paintings by John William Waterhouse

Top 10 Most Famous Paintings by John William Waterhouse

Who is John William Waterhouse?

John William Waterhouse was an English painter known for his Academic style paintings and Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood's style of art. His artwork is known for portraying women from both old Greek folklore and Arthurian legend.

Waterhouse's initial works were not Pre-Raphaelite in nature and were of old-style subjects of Alma-Tadema and Frederic Leighton.

John William Waterhouse Famous Artworks:

 

The Lady of Shalott by John William Waterhouse

The Lady of Shalott by John William Waterhouse

Waterhouse painted three variants of this composition, in 1888, 1894 and 1915. It is one of his most renowned works, done in the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood style. 

The Lady of Shalott was given to the general public by Sir Henry Tate in 1894 and is in plain view at the Tate Britain in London. 

The painting depicts the main character of Tennyson's poem, likewise titled: The Lady of Shalott (1842). In the poem, the Lady had been bound to her quarters on an island near the city of Camelot. She is cursed to stay in the tower and look at the outside world through a mirror reflection. 

The painting reveals the third part of the poem, where Sir Launcelot is seen by Sharlott and the sound of him singing takes her away from the tower and breaks her curse and she leaves the tower and gets on a boat to go to the city of Camelot.

Artist: John William Waterhouse

Year: 1888

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 183 cm × 230 cm (72 in × 91 in)

Location: Tate Britain, London

Leonardo Da Vinci Most Famous Paintings

 

Hylas and the Nymphs by John William Waterhouse

Hylas and the Nymphs by John William Waterhouse

The work of art delineates a moment from the Greek and Roman legend of the unfortunate youth of Hylas, in which the delighted Hylas is snatched by Naiads (female water nymphs) while looking for drinking water.

Hylas was the child of King Theiodamas of the Dryopians. After Hercules executed Hylas' dad, Hylas became an Argonaut, going with Jason in his journey on his ship Argo to look for the Golden Fleece. During the voyage, Hylas was sent to discover freshwater. He found a lake with Naiads, and they attracted Hylas into the water and he vanished with them.

The painting portrays Hylas, wearing a blue tunic and bearing a wide-necked water container. The nymphs are naked, with radiant skin and yellow and white blossoms in their reddish-brown hair. They all have fundamentally the same physical highlights. Hylas is being tempted to enter the water, from which he won't return.

One of the nymphs holds his wrist and elbow, a second culls at his tunic, and a third holds out certain pearls in the palm of her hand.

The scene is delineated from a marginally raised position, looking down at the water like Hylas, so no sky is noticeable. Hylas' position powers the watcher's eyes onto the nymphs in the water.

Artist: John William Waterhouse

Year: 1896

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 98.2 by 163.3 centimeters (38.7 in × 64.3 in)

Location: Manchester Art Gallery

Michelangelo Most Famous Paintings

 

Boreas by John William Waterhouse

Boreas by John William Waterhouse

The striking portrait includes a young girl who is standing in the blowing wind as her drape is being blowin away by the wind.

The work of art is set in a spring scene with pink blooms and yellow daffodils. The captivating work of art is named after Boreas, the Greek lord of the north wind.

For over 90 years, this composition was lost until it reappeared again during the 1990s where it was available for purchase.

Artist: John William Waterhouse

Year: 1903

Medium: Oil on canvas

Location: Private collection

Dante Gabriel Rossetti Most Famous Paintings

 

Miranda - The Tempest by John William Waterhouse

Miranda - The Tempest by John William Waterhouse

Miranda is the courageous woman in one of the later works of William Shakespeare "The Tempest".

"Miranda and the tempest" made by Waterhouse in 1916, is one of his most unmistakable of his works and portrays the most prevalent outline of the play.

Miranda looks on as a ship is cut in two by the ground-breaking waves that push it into the stones. Her very own clothing is additionally swilling around in the rough breeze.

Artist: John William Waterhouse

Year: 1916

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 110.4×137.8 cm

Location: Private collection

Francois Boucher Most Famous Paintings

 

The Soul of the Rose by John William Waterhouse

The Soul of the Rose by John William Waterhouse

This is one of his few paintings not depicting an ancient tale or famous fable. Instead, it shows a woman in a garden it's believed that it's from a poem of Alfred Lord Tennyson. The poem talks about a woman who in her garden is thinking about a past lover.

Below you will a piece of the poem.

'Come into the Garde, Maud' by Alfred Lord Tennyson:

Come into the garden, Maud,
For the black bat, Night, has flown,
Come into the garden, Maud,
I am here at the gate alone;
And the woodbine spices are wafted abroad,
And the musk of the roses blown.

For a breeze of morning moves,
And the planet of Love is on high,
Beginning to faint in the light that she loves
On a bed of daffodil sky,
To faint in the light of the sun she loves,
To faint in his light, and to die.

All night have the roses heard
The flute, violin, bassoon;
All night has the casement jessamine stirr'd
To the dancers dancing in tune
Till a silence fell with the waking bird,
And a hush with the setting moon.

I said to the lily, "There is but one
With whom she has heart to be gay.

When will the dancers leave her alone?
She is weary of dance and play. "
Now half to the setting moon are gone,
And half to the rising day;
Low on the sand and loud on the stone
The last wheel echoes away.

I said to the rose, "The brief night goes
In babble and revel and wine.

O young lordlover, what sighs are those
For one that will never be thine?
But mine, but mine," so I sware to the rose,
"For ever and ever, mine. "

And the soul of the rose went into my blood,
As the music clash'd in the hall;
And long by the garden lake I stood,
For I heard your rivulet fall
From the lake to the meadow and on to the wood,
Our wood, that is dearer than all;

From the meadow your walks have left so sweet
That whenever a March-wind sighs
He sets the jewelprint of your feet
In violets blue as your eyes,
To the woody hollows in which we meet
And the valleys of Paradise.

The slender acacia would not shake
One long milk-bloom on the tree;
The white lake-blossom fell into the lake,
As the pimpernel dozed on the lea;
But the rose was awake all night for your sake,
Knowing your promise to me;
The lilies and roses were all awake,
They sigh'd for the dawn and thee.

Queen rose of the rosebud garden of girls,
Come hither, the dances are done,
In gloss of satin and glimmer of pearls,
Queen lily and rose in one;
Shine out, little head, sunning over with curls,
To the flowers, and be their sun.

There has fallen a splendid tear
From the passion-flower at the gate.

She is coming, my dove, my dear;
She is coming, my life, my fate;
The red rose cries, "She is near, she is near;"
And the white rose weeps, "She is late;"
The larkspur listens, "I hear, I hear;"
And the lily whispers, "I wait. "

She is coming, my own, my sweet;
Were it ever so airy a tread,
My heart would hear her and beat,
Were it earth in an earthy bed;
My dust would hear her and beat,
Had I lain for a century dead;
Would start and tremble under her feet,
And blossom in purple and red.


Artist:
John William Waterhouse

Year: 1908

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 34¾ x 23¼ in. (88.3 x 59.1 cm.)

Location: Private collection

John Everett Millais Most Famous Paintings

 

The Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse

The Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse

The woman in this image gives off an impression of being a witch or priestess, enriched with magic powers, perhaps the influence of prescience.

Her haircut resembles that of an early Anglo-Saxon; her dress is enhanced with Persian or Greek warriors. In her left hand, she holds a sickle. With a long wand in her other hand, she appears to be drawing a circle while preparing an enchantment.

Artist: John William Waterhouse

Year: 1866

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 6′ 0″ x 4′ 2″

Location: Tate Britain, Private collection

Giorgione Most Famous Paintings

 

Circe Offering the Cup to Ulysses by John William Waterhouse

Circe Offering the Cup to Ulysses by John William Waterhouse

Waterhouse was motivated by Homer's Odyssey. "Circe" was a lovely sorceress who transformed humans into creatures by giving them a wine loaded up with magic.

Circe utilized such magic on Ulysses' men transforming them into pigs while Ulysses AKA (Odysseus) was dealing with another issue. Ulysses knowing of her magic had got a prescription from Hermes to avert Circe's magic.

He went to Circe, who had him drink the mixture to transform him into a pig too, when it didn't work Ulysses drew his sword on Circe who in fear beseeched him to save her.

Artist: John William Waterhouse

Year: 1891

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 175 cm × 92 cm (69 in × 36 in)

Location: Gallery Oldham, Oldham

Top 10 Most Famous Paintings by Wassily Kandinsky

 

Circe Invidiosa by John William Waterhouse

 Circe Invidiosa by John William Waterhouse

The painting portrays a tall lady with her head tilted forward as she tips a bowl of fluid into the water beneath. At her feet, there is a shadowy shape and bent foliage.

In Greek mythology, Circe is a goddess or sorceress who had knowledge of using herbs and mixing magical enchantments.

In this Waterhouse's painting, we see Circe pouring a green substance into the water with the goal of changing her adversary Scylla into a beast.

Artist: John William Waterhouse

Year: 1892

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 179 cm × 85 cm (70 in × 33 in)

Location: Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

Top 10 Most Famous Paintings by Thomas Sully

 

A Mermaid by John William Waterhouse

A Mermaid by John William Waterhouse

The mermaid sits alone near land, brushing out her long red hair with her lips parted in some sort of melody. Next to her is a huge shell with pearls.

Mermaids customarily baited mariners to their demise using their charming tunes. 

Artist: John William Waterhouse

Year: 1900

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 3′ 3″ x 2′ 2″

Location: Royal Academy of Arts

Top 10 Most Famous Paintings by Sandro Botticelli

 

Echo and Narcissus by John William Waterhouse

Echo and Narcissus by John William Waterhouse

This painting delineates a scene from 'Reverberation and Narcissus' from the Roman poet Ovid's Metamorphosis.

Artist: John William Waterhouse

Year: 1903

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 109.2 cm × 189.2 cm (43 in × 74 in)

Location: Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

Top 10 Most Famous Paintings by Georgia O'Keeffe

 

John William Waterhouse Paintings

 

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