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bal du moulin de la galette printbal du moulin de la galette printbal du moulin de la galette printbal du moulin de la galette print

Bal du Moulin de la Galette by Pierre-Auguste Renoir [Acrylic Wall Art Decor]

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1919606|12x12
Acrylic print
ATX Fine Arts

Bal du Moulin de la Galette Print

Dance at Le moulin de la Galette

A masterpiece of modern fine art, the Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette is one of the most well-known Impressionist paintings and a spectacular model of Pierre-Auguste Renoir's ability to catch light in a painting. The Bal du Moulin de la Galette was also identified as Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette the painting revealed a normal scene of late 1800’s working-class citizens, who on a Sunday afternoon, would gather together to dance, drink, and eat.

The famous painting depicts joy through smiling expressions of the people, except for a man resting on the right who appears to be in a serious mood. Renoir has created a glorious environment using the impact of light on the canvas to paint a beautiful scene. The composition seems to shine, yet it has dappled spots of shade which add a graphic nature to the painting. The painting represents bright yet pragmatic color tones painted using liquid brush strokes. Similar to other Impressionist paintings, Bal du Moulin de la Galette has a remarkable impression on the viewer. The observer is instantly carried into a happy-go-lucky world, free from the worries of daily life, full of joy.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was a famous artist who was known for producing joyful compositions that were natural pictures of real life and caught the authentic sense of particular scenes. Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette was a magnificent example of his ability to do so. Renoir's dance scenes were among his own favorites, as they were packed of people experiencing themselves in a fun atmosphere. The sunlight compares well with the colored clothing, and Renoir's brilliant brushstrokes unite movement to the composition. The daylight seeping through the trees gives Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette a comfortable and summery quality as well as a feeling of immediacy. Renoir exhibits his pure gift in this painting. Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette is a primary composition example that combines the art of collective portrait, still life, and landscape art.

Dance at le Moulin de la Galette Story

The Moulin de la Galette was an open-air dancehall and café that was frequented by many artists living in Paris. Renoir attended Sunday afternoon dances and enjoyed watching the happy couples. For him, it provided the perfect setting for a painting. Most of the figures featured in Dance at le Moulin de la Galette were Renoir's friends, but he also used a few professional models. Thus, it can be said that the scene he depicts is not a realistic representation of the Moulin's clientele, but rather an organized set of portraits.

This painting was first shown at the Impressionist exhibition of 1877 and demonstrated the original technique developed by Renoir. This canvas shows Renoir's friends, Frank Lamy, Norbert Goeneutte, and Georges Rivière gathered around the central table. Rivière, a writer who knew Renoir well at this time, wrote a review of Dance at le Moulin de la Galette in the journal L'Iimpressionniste which accompanied its exhibition. The writer referred to Dance at le Moulin de la Galette as a "page of history, a precious and strictly accurate portrayal of Parisian life. " Yet, others were not so kind. Many contemporary critics regarded this canvas as merely a blurred impression of the scene.

Known for his pleasant paintings, Dance at le Moulin de la Galette is regarded as one of the happiest compositions in Renoir's oeuvre. Today, it is on display at the Musee d'Orsay in Paris and is one the most celebrated works in the history of Impressionism.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Renoir was an artist famed for creating joyful paintings that were essentially snapshots of real-life and captured the true spirit of particular scenes. Dance at le Moulin de la Galette was a great example of this. Dance scenes were among Renoirs favorites as they were full of people enjoying themselves. The Moulin de la Galette was one café that the Renoir frequented as it was close to his home and it provided a great theme for his work.

Much of Renoir's early work was inspired by his peers and other artists. In 1869 Renoir worked very closely with Monet and both were focused on painting light and water. It was during this time that they developed the technique that became central to Impressionism. They discovered that shadows are not brown or black but are colored by the objects around them and that the 'local color' of objects is modified by the light and reflections of surrounding objects. At this time, the styles of Renoir and Monet were almost identical but in the 1870s they explored their own methods and worked alone more frequently. As well as similarities to Monets works, Dance at le Moulin de la Galette shows influences from a range of other artists. In his early career, Renoir was greatly inspired by the artistry of Eugene Delacroix, a fellow French man whose work typified 19th-century romanticism. Renoir and the other impressionists were also greatly influenced by Delacroix's technique, which saw him use contrasting colors with small brushstrokes to produce a very vivid effect.

Dance at le Moulin de la Galette also emulates the luminosity of Camille Corot. Corot was a key figure in landscape painting and his works referenced Neo-classicalism as well as anticipating the Plein-air modernism of Impressionism. Additionally, Renoir admired the realism of Gustave Courbet and Édouard Manet. He was also a great admirer of Degas perception of movement.
Like many of Renoir's early paintings, Dance at le Moulin de la Galette is a snapshot of real-life and it captures true Parisian culture. However, this canvas was unique because of its size. It was Renoir's most ambitious figure painting and no artist before him had created a canvas capturing an aspect of the daily life of this magnitude.

Bal du moulin de la galette print

bal du moulin de la galette print

Composition:

Like Manet did in La Musique aux Tuileries, Renoir included a number of portraits in Dance at le Moulin de la Galette and the majority of portraits were his friends. By cutting off figures in the piece, Renoir suggests that the scene continued beyond the frame. It seems that his time spent painting Plein-air landscapes at Argenteuil prompted him to use human beings, especially women, as the focus of this canvas. Renoir uses brightly colored brushstrokes to add movement to the figures as well as depth to this piece. Renoir bathes the figures in sun and shadow, breaking up the composition with patches of light and capturing the vibrancy of the scene. He blends colors that worked well for him and this results in a painting that is rich in form and with a fluidity of brush stroke. This innovative style and the grand scale of Dance at le Moulin de la Galette is a sign of Renoir's artistic drive.

Color Palette:

Renoir uses brightly colored brush strokes and opts to blend colors that suit him best. His refusal to use black together with the absence of outlines are traditional Impressionist techniques. Renoir uses patches of soft color and combines this with vibrantly colored figures, to give the impression of speckled light beaming through the trees. He creates the patches of light with soft pinks and purples, while for the figures he uses bolder shades of blue, red, and green for the clothing.

Lighting:

Renoir's use of light in Dance at le Moulin de la Galette as well as its sketchiness is typically Impressionistic. He bathes the figures in both sun and shadow and spots of natural and artificial light divide the composition and depict the vibrancy of the scene. The sunlight contrasts well with the dark clothing, and Renoir's bright brushstrokes add movement to the painting. Sunlight filtering through the trees gives Dance at le Moulin de la Galette a cheerful and summery feel as well as a sense of immediacy. Renoir reveals his true talent in this picture. It is a major composition that links the art of collective portrait, still life, and landscape painting.


Initial reception: 

A founder of the Impressionist movement, Renoirs work received a great deal of criticism and Dance at le Moulin de la Galette was no exception, drawing mixed reactions from viewers. However, today it is one of the most celebrated works from the Impressionist period. 

While many critics praised Renoir's technique of fluid brush strokes and flickered light, others felt that this canvas was a somewhat blurred impression of the scene. Like many of his paintings, Dance at le Moulin de la Galettes use of light created a sense of vitality which did not obey the rules of the Salon. Focusing on classical rather than contemporary styles, the Salon did not appreciate dance halls depiction such as this.

However, Georges Rivière, a writer and good friend of Renoirs at this time, who features in the painting, write a review of Dance at le Moulin de la Galettes in the journal L'Iimpressionniste which accompanied the exhibition. From 1879 to 1894 Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette was owned by the French painter Gustave Caillebotte; on his death, it was accepted by the French Republic in lieu of death duties. From 1896 to 1929 the painting was displayed in the Musee du Luxembourg in Paris; from 1929 to 1986 in the Louvre; until finally it was moved to the Musee d'Orsay.

Time to shine! The high gloss finish of acrylic prints makes your art the focus of any room! Half the weight of glass and many times more resistant to impact, acrylic prints are both long-lasting and a seriously modern and impressive way to display your art!

• Made with ACRYLITE® (acrylic/plexiglass) known for its weather resistance, brilliance, transparency and surface hardness.
• Reflective surface gives super vivid high definition results.
• Floating mount affixed to the back panel means your acrylic print is ready to hang out of the box.
• Easy care with no worry of damaging the print. Wipe gently with a mild glass cleaner.

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