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Famous Paintings By Édouard Manet [Top 20 Art Masterpieces]
Dawit Abeza
Famous Paintings By Édouard Manet [Top 20 Art Masterpieces]

Famous Paintings By Édouard Manet [Top 20 Art Masterpieces]

Édouard Manet was a prestigious French painter of the nineteenth century, who exceeded expectations in delineate present-day art on canvas. He had a skill of rearranging subtleties and freely utilizing brush strokes to portray his works.

The greater part of his masterpieces fixated on bistro scenes the majority of which spoke to the way of life of the upper strata of the general public.

He likewise made plenty of theoretical paintings all through his vocation, splendidly playing with hues. The beneath artworks are the most significant by Édouard Manet - that both diagram the major imaginative periods, and feature the best accomplishments by the artist.

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Édouard Manet Artwork

The Luncheon on the Grass (Le Dejeuner sur l'Herbe) by Édouard Manet

The Luncheon on the Grass (Le Dejeuner sur l'Herbe) by Édouard Manet

The painting highlights a bare lady calmly dining with two completely dressed men. Her body is unmistakably lit and she gazes legitimately at the watcher. The two men, dressed as youthful dandies, appear to be occupied with discussion, disregarding the lady. Before them, the lady's garments, a bin of natural product, and a round portion of bread are shown, as in a still life. Out of sight, a delicately clad lady washes in a stream.

Excessively enormous in correlation with the figures in the frontal area, she appears to skim above them. The generally painted foundation needs profundity, giving the watcher the feeling that the scene isn't occurring outside, however in a studio. This impression is fortified by the utilization of expansive "studio" light, which throws no shadows.

The man on the correct wears a level cap with decoration, a sort ordinarily worn inside. In spite of the everyday subject, Manet intentionally picked an enormous canvas size, estimating 81.9 x 104.1 in (208 by 264.5 cm), regularly saved for verifiable, strict, and fanciful subjects. The style of the painting breaks with the scholarly conventions of the time.

He didn't attempt to conceal the brush strokes; the painting even looks incomplete in certain parts of the scene. The bare is likewise distinctly not the same as the smooth, faultless figures of Cabanel or Ingres.

A bare lady calmly dining with completely dressed men was an attack against spectators' feeling of respectability, however, Émile Zola, a contemporary of Manet's, contended this was normal in paintings found in the Louver. Zola likewise felt that such a response originated from survey art uniquely in contrast to "scientific" painters like Manet, who utilize a painting's subject as an appearance to paint.

The figures of this painting are a demonstration of how profoundly associated Manet was to Le Déjeuner sur l'herbe. Some expect that the scene of the painting is intended to be l'île Saint-Ouen, which was simply up the Seine from his family property in Gennevilliers.

Manet regularly utilized genuine models and individuals he knew as a kind of perspective during his creation procedure. The female naked is believed to be Victorine Meurent, the lady who turned into his most loved and as often as possible depicted model, who later was the subject of Olympia.

Completed in: 1863  

Style: Impressionism, Modern art

Measurements: 208 cm × 264.5 cm

Location: Musée d'Orsay (Paris)

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Battle of the USS "Kearsarge" and the CSS "Alabama" by Édouard Manet

The Battle of the USS "Kearsarge" and the CSS "Alabama" by Édouard Manet

Since his days as a Merchant Marine, Manet was constantly intrigued by the ocean. The painting celebrates the Battle of Cherbourg of 1864, a maritime commitment between the Union cruiser USS Kearsarge and the Confederate looter CSS Alabama. Numerous onlookers had the option to see the fight from the bank of France and saw that the USS Kearsarge sank the CSS Alabama.

Not having seen the fight himself, Manet depended on press depictions of the battle to archive his work. Inside one month of this fight, Manet had just finished this painting and got it in plain view in the print shop of Alfred Cadart in Paris. The painting was gained by the French art gatherer Marguerite Charpentier in 1878 and is presently in the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The composition is fairly level with little degree in the shade of the sea to show separation, like a Japanese print.

Completed in: 1864

Style: Modern art

Measurements: 134 cm × 127 cm

Location: Philadelphia Museum of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Olympia by Édouard Manet

Olympia by Édouard Manet 

Olympia is a painting by Édouard Manet, first displayed at the 1865 Paris Salon, which shows a naked lady ("Olympia") lying on a bed being brought blossoms by a worker. Olympia was displayed by Victorine Meurent and Olympia's hireling by the art model Laure. Olympia's angry look caused stun and amazement when the painting was first displayed in light of the fact that various subtleties in the image recognized her like a whore.

The French government procured the painting in 1890 after an open membership sorted out by Claude Monet. The painting is designed according to Titian's Venus of Urbino (c. 1534). Though the left hand of Titian's Venus is twisted and seems to allure, Olympia's left hand seems to square, which has been translated as emblematic of her sexual freedom from men and her job as a whore, giving or limiting access to her body as an end-result of installment.

Manet supplanted the little pooch (image of constancy) in Titian's painting with a dark feline, which generally symbolized prostitution. Olympia hatefully overlooks the roses introduced to her by her worker, most likely a blessing from a customer. Some have proposed that she is looking toward the entryway, as her customer jumps in unannounced.

The painting veers off from the scholastic group in its style, described by wide, speedy brushstrokes, studio lighting that takes out mid-tones, huge shading surfaces, and shallow profundity. Not at all like the smooth glorified bare of Alexandre Cabanel's La naissance de Vénus, likewise painted in 1863, Olympia is a genuine lady whose bareness is stressed by the cruel lighting. The canvas alone is 51.4 x 74.8 inches, which is fairly huge for this classification style painting.

Most paintings that were this size delineated recorded or legendary occasions, so the size of the work, among different variables, caused shock. At long last, Olympia is genuinely slender by the artistic models of the time and her moderately undeveloped body is more innocent than womanly.

Completed in: 1863

Style: Impressionism, Realism, Modern art

Measurements: 130.5 cm × 190 cm

Location: Musée d’Orsay

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

A Bar at the Folies-Bergere (Un bar aux Folies Bergère) by Édouard Manet

A Bar at the Folies-Bergere (Un bar aux Folies Bergère) by Édouard Manet

It delineates a scene in the Folies Bergère club in Paris. The painting initially had a place with the writer Emmanuel Chabrier, a dear companion of Manet, and hung over his piano. The painting embodies Manet's promise to Realism in its nitty-gritty portrayal of a contemporary scene.

Numerous highlights have baffled pundits yet practically every one of them have been appeared to have a reason, and the painting has been the subject of various mainstream and insightful articles. The painting is wealthy in subtleties which give pieces of information to social class and milieu.

The lady at the bar is a genuine individual, known as Suzon, who worked at the Folies-Bergère in the mid-1880s. For his painting, Manet represented her in his studio. Manet's organization exhibits a visual riddle. The barmaid takes a gander at the watcher, while the mirror behind her mirrors the huge lobby and benefactors of the Folies-Bergère. Manet appears to have painted the picture from a perspective straightforwardly inverse the barmaid.

However, this perspective is repudiated by the impression of the articles on the bar and the figures of the barmaid and a benefactor off to one side. Given such irregularities, Manet appears not to have offered a solitary, determinate situation from which to certainly comprehend the entirety.

Completed in: 1882

Style: Impressionism, Modern art

Measurements: 96 cm x 130 cm

Location: Courtauld Gallery

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Execution of Emperor Maximilian by Édouard Manet

The Execution of Emperor Maximilian by Édouard Manet

Execution of Emperor Maximilian is one of only a handful couple of works where Manet looks for a sensational impact.

The painting represents the peak of a notable recorded scene. Napoleon III mediated in Mexico to keep it from inclining toward the United States, for which he had no compassion and which was around then excessively associated with the Civil War to fight his activities viably.

French soldiers attacked Mexico on June 1863, and a get together of Mexican notables announced Maxirnilian - the sibling of Franz Joseph of Austria - Emperor. However, when the Civil War was finished, the United States requested that the French pull back their military, and Napoleon, in 1866, agreed. Abandoned by his supporters, Maximilian was caught in 1867 at Quere-taro, sentenced to death, and shot in backlash for the synopsis executions he himself had requested.

Political sensitivities made it inconceivable for Manet to display his paintings in France during the rule of Napoleon III, yet the Mannheim form was shown in New York and Boston in 1879–1880, brought there by Manet's companion, the drama artist Émilie Ambre. The Mannheim and Boston variants were displayed together at the Salon d'Automne in 1905.

Completed in: 1868

Style: Modern art

Measurements: 252 cm × 305 cm

Location: Kunsthalle Mannheim

Medium: oil on canvas

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Bullfight by Édouard Manet

Bullfight by Édouard Manet

This is the most capturing and sensible of Manet's bullfights and furthermore the most energetic in the system. The field transmits daylight, and the bull and the toreros' caps make dark sprinkles against its splendor.

A couple of striking strokes sketch in the group in the crates and on the levels of seats. We wonder about the aptitude with which the artist has protected the solidarity of his composition without bringing down its impact of uncalculated instantaneousness.

The experience of man and monster is honorably characterized and focused. The red madder of the muleta, the blood from the tore midsection of the steed, the purples, mauves, and vermilions of the onlookers, all development the pictorial climate of this bull ring, with long shadows loosening up over the field. In this painting, albeit enlivened by a Spanish scene frequently treated by Francisco Goya, Manet is completely himself.

The image is one of those which uncover him as a trailblazer of Impressionism, and he has prevailing here, more than in numerous other works, in conveying a sentiment of dramatization and drawing out the mercilessness of the battle. Demise can be detected underneath this reasonable blue sky.

Completed in: 1865–1866

Style: Realism

Measurements: 48 cm x 60 cm

Location: Frick Collection, New York City

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Café-Concert by Édouard Manet

The Café-Concert by Édouard Manet

The setting has been recognized as the Brasserie Reichshoffen on the Boulevard Rochechouart. Manet gives us people in the new brasseries and bistros of Paris, which gives the watcher a substitute perspective on the new Parisian life. Manet guaranteed he was painting "des oeuvres sinceres" or "sincere works".

The ladies delineated in these scenes were seeking sure dangers as to perception and ethical quality. In The Café-Concert, Manet displays a bistro concert in which three focal figures structure a triangle however are altogether occupied with inverse directions.

The area of a bistro concert, probably easygoing, is implied by Manet to be one of separation. The server appreciates a lager, while the lady at the bar smokes a cigarette and seems stifled and the man seems, by all accounts, to be calm as he watches the presentation (the artist known as "La Belle Polonaise" is reflected in the mirror out of sight of the painting). It is noticed that the man summons confidence since men, in contrast to ladies, could visit bistros without weakness.

Completed in: 1879

Style: Modern art

Measurements: ‎47.3 cm × 39.1 cm

Location: The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Balcony by Édouard Manet

The Balcony by Édouard Manet

The painting delineates four figures on a balcony, one of whom is sitting; the painter Berthe Morisot, who wedded Manet's brother Eugène in 1874. In the middle is the painter Jean Baptiste Antoine Guillemet. On the privilege is Fanny Claus, a musician. The fourth figure partially clouded in the inside's experience, is conceivably Léon Leenhoff, Manet's son.

The three characters, who were all companions of Manet, appear to be disconnected from one another: while Berthe Morisot, on the left, resembles a sentimental and out of reach courageous woman, the youthful musician Fanny Claus and the painter Antoine Guillemet appear to show detachment.

The kid out of sight is likely Manet's son, Léon. Simply behind the railings, there are a hydrangea in a fired pot and a pooch with a ball beneath Morisot's seat.

Completed in: 1868

Style: Impressionism, Modern art, Realism

Measurements: 170 cm × 124 cm

Location: ‎Musée d’Orsay, Paris

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Nana by Édouard Manet

Nana by Édouard Manet

Manet chose to show his painting in the window of a shop on the Boulevard des Capucines, one of Paris' central avenue. The painting accumulated consideration and groups during its show, because of Manet's distinction in Paris.

The painting shows a young and lovely lady who stands before a mirror with two doused candles, her face went to the onlooker. Her dress is deficient; she wears a white chemise, blue undergarment, silk leggings, and high-obeyed footwear. The inside proposes that it is a boudoir.

Behind the lady is a couch with two pads. A carefully dressed man, sitting on the couch, can be partly observed on the privilege of the painting. On the left side, there is a seat, a table, and a window box. Both the title and the various subtleties propose that the image speaks to a high-class whore and her customer. "Nana" was a well known expected name for female whores during the second 50% of the nineteenth century.

Completed in: 1877

Style: Impressionism, Modern art

Measurements: 154 cm × 115 cm

Location: ‎Kunsthalle Hamburg

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Spanish Singer by Édouard Manet

The Spanish Singer by Édouard Manet

This painting, which mirrors the Parisian vogue for Spanish art and culture during the Second Empire, won Manet his first mainstream and basic accomplishment in quite a while debuting at the Salon of 1861. In spite of the fact that the image was appreciated for its practical detail, Manet didn't camouflage the way that it was created in a studio utilizing a model and props.

The left-gave vocalist holds a guitar hung for a right-gave player, and his fingering recommends that he was new to the instrument. His outfit was formed from ensembles that Manet kept close by; a few frills return in paintings in this display.

Completed in: 1860

Style: Realism, History painting

Measurements: 147.3 cm x 114.3 cm

Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Berthe Morisot with a Bouquet of Violets by Édouard Manet

Berthe Morisot with a Bouquet of Violets by Édouard Manet

It portrays individual painter Berthe Morisot wearing a black grieving dress, with a scarcely unmistakable bunch of violets. The painting, some of the time known as Portrait of Berthe Morisot, Berthe Morisot in a black hat or Young lady in a black hat. Manet additionally made a carving and two lithographs of a similar organization.

Manet painted Morisot with black eyes, in spite of the fact that her eyes were really green. The dull ensemble and eyes may insinuate Manet's feeling that she looked Spanish. Manet had before painted his very own comparable representation mother in grieving, made in 1863, which shows his mom clad in black, on a dull foundation.

Completed in: 1872

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 55 cm x 38 cm

Location: Musée d’Orsay

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Boy Carrying a Sword by Édouard Manet

Boy Carrying a Sword by Édouard Manet

Manet's stepson, Léon Koëlla-Leenhoff, reviewed that he had postured for this image in 1861 when he was around ten years of age. Manet dressed him in a seventeenth-century outfit, including a period sword as a prop—a tribute to the incomparable Spanish painters he appreciated, prominently Velázquez.

Completed in: 1861

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 131 cm × 93.3 cm

Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York)

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Railway by Édouard Manet

The Railway by Édouard Manet

A train passes, leaving a haze of steam noticeable all around. A young lady, her back turned, stands to gaze at it. A young lady, sitting next to her, gazes upward from her book to friend out.

It's an impression, found one clear morning in Paris, by the rail tracks outside the Gare Saint-Lazare. his road scene is created, and into the kind of genuine occurrence that - blending mishap with the request - sticks in the memory. Its boldest, bluntest stroke of request is the level on screen of railings that keeps running over, going off-picture left and right and top.

It partitions the forefront from the foundation, driving the figures up to the front. It sets out a rehashing example of black stripes. Like the railway itself, it's a meddling certainty. There's no train in see, yet these iron railings slice through the scene like the railway line cuts through the cutting edge city.

The entire scene is articulated on this iron grille. It focuses on the figures' restricting headings: the lady supported against it, confronting distinctly front; the young lady dismissed, anonymous, glancing through it into the image's profundities. Its vertical shafts cut against the bends of the young lady's raised arm, and her belling skirt, and the rich tricorn hole that structures between the figures.

The vacantly basic plan segregates the reduced visual unpredictability of the young lady. She's a mass of extras: her lap loaded up with sleeves, book, hound, fan, her huge round catches, her deliberately spread hair, her hat with its botanical peak. Be that as it may, these thick social signs are simply certainties, not intimations.

Furthermore, the railings' hard, dull, framework, set against the brilliant scattering steam, tries the greatest differentiation - a keynote for an image that is brimming with sharp edges and delicate breaks down, of outlines and hazy spots. The back of the young lady's head and neck contrast the surging stream.

Her elbow converges into it. One side of the lady's jaw is intensely characterized. Different strokes are untraceable into the face. The image has a removed, cartoon lucidity that continues slipping into vulnerability.

It's a scene that doesn't fix. It's somewhat similar to a frieze. There's a trace of traditional statuary in the young lady's raised arm and, in the line of railings, there's a trace of an old-style corridor. Yet, they're just insights. Manet's enchantment isn't to demand to find the endless in the contemporary.

Completed in: 1872 / 1873

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 93.3 cm × 111.5 cm

Location: National Gallery of Art, (Washington D.C.)

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Fifer by Édouard Manet

The Fifer by Édouard Manet

The Fifer was painted by Édouard Manet in 1866. Manet painted in both the Realist and Impressionistic style, and like numerous inventive artists, was not well-refreshing time permitting.

The painting developed in notoriety in the twentieth century, moving from private accumulations to the Musee du Jeu de Paume lastly to the Musee d'Orsay, where it is as of now shown.

A young boy wearing a military uniform of red jeans, a dim coat with metal fastens, a white scarf and a dull cap with a red ribbon plays a fife (woodwind). The flute is dull wood with silver fittings, and a metal conveying case for the instrument rests at his correct side.

The figure is completely lit up from the front with just a trace of shadow behind him, giving the painting an inquisitive, practically photographic levelness.

Completed in: 1866

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 161 cm × 97 cm

Location: Musée d'Orsay (Paris)

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

The Rue Mosnier Dressed with Flags by Édouard Manet

The Rue Mosnier Dressed with Flags by Édouard Manet

The urban street was a chief subject of Impressionist and Modernist painting; numerous artists meant to show not just the change and development of the Industrial Age yet how it likewise influenced society.

Manet's eyes saw both rich travelers in hansom taxis and, in the frontal area, a laborer conveying a stepping stool. The slouched amputee on braces, maybe a war veteran or bum, passes by fenced-in flotsam and jetsam left from the development of another train track.

Manet's affectability to the related expenses and forfeits tempered his idealistic perspective on national pride and newly discovered flourishing.

Completed in: 1878

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 65.5 cm × 81 cm

Location: J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles)

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Argenteuil by Édouard Manet

Argenteuil by Édouard Manet

It is one of Manet's first attempts to qualify completely as an Impressionist work, because of its naturalistic subject and its strong palette, for example, the blue of the stream. The work shows a man in a boater and a young lady sitting close to the Seine at Argenteuil (presently in Val-d'Oise) - the town is out of sight.

Manet asked Claude Monet and his significant other Camille to model for the painting however they couldn't hold the posture for quite some time. Manet's brother by marriage Rudolf Leenhoff or nobleman Barbier (a companion of Guy de Maupassant) was most likely the model for the man, however, the model for the lady is obscure.

Completed in: 1874

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 149 cm × 115 cm

Location: Musée des Beaux-Arts Tournai

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

The Absinthe Drinker (Le Buveur d'absinthe) by Édouard Manet

The Absinthe Drinker (Le Buveur d'absinthe) by Édouard Manet

The painting is viewed as his first significant painting and first unique work. The Absinthe Drinker is a full-length picture of a heavy drinker chiffonnier (cloth picker) named Collardet who frequented the region around the Louver in Paris.

Collardet is painted in for the most part dark-colored, dim and dark tones. The subject is standing, wears a dark top cap and is enclosed by a darker shroud, similar to a blue-blood; he inclines toward an edge with the vacant jug disposed of on the floor by his feet. Manet later included a half-full glass of absinthe on the edge.

Completed in: 1859

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 180.5 cm × 105.6 cm

Location: NY Carlsberg Glyptotek (Copenhagen)

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Luncheon in the Studio (Le déjeuner dans l'atelier) by Édouard Manet

Luncheon in the Studio (Le déjeuner dans l'atelier) by Édouard Manet

partially a representation of 16-year-old Léon Leenhoff — the child of Suzanne Leenhoff before her 1863 union with Manet, and potentially the child of Manet or Manet's dad Auguste — it is additionally a confounding work that has gotten restricted consideration inside Manet's oeuvre. Lehnhoff is the focal point of the painting, with his back to the next two individuals, who have at different focuses been distinguished as his mom and Manet.

These recognizable pieces of proof are presently observed as off base; the man situated at the table, smoking a stogie and getting a charge out of an espresso and a digestif, is mysterious—despite the fact that he looks to some extent like Manet (his companion, the painter Auguste Rousselin has likewise been recommended). The lady looking toward the watcher is a hireling.

Completed in: 1868

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 118 cm × 154 cm

Location: Neue Pinakothek (Munich)

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

In the Conservatory by Édouard Manet

In the Conservatory by Édouard Manet

The painting is one of the most superbly new of every one of Manet's works. It delineates a scene from Paris society's life when Alphonse Daudet was distributing his books.

The artist has succeeded splendidly in this discussion piece, in which the lady resembles a dainty blossom brilliant with the principal sprout of youth, while the figure next to her, a few years more seasoned than she, has the attractive experience of a man about town.

One must respect the manner in which Manet has differentiated the rose tints of the tissue with the ivory tones of the neckline and cap worn by Mme Guillemet. For Manet, his personal life was likewise a subject for painting. Following afterward, different Impressionists would, each in their turn, cross the edge of private life, a territory of art where the Japanese were undisputed bosses.

There is no voyeurism in Manet. His subject is simply the female body completely engaged, and in delineating it, he broadened the domain of his art. Here, deprived of artifice, a lady contemplates success as she goes as far as wash. Society lady is gotten pre-society. Be that as it may, however the subject, in Manet, never again had a similar significance, his sexiness comes to pass as emphatically as his warmth.

Completed in: 1879

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 115 cm × 150 cm

Location: Alte Nationalgalerie (Berlin)

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

The Dead Christ with Angels by Édouard Manet

The Dead Christ with Angels by Édouard Manet

Manet recognized the hotspot for this painting, the first of a few strict scenes, in the engraving on the stone: the Gospel as per Saint John. Be that as it may, in the entry referred to, Christ's tomb is unfilled aside from two blessed messengers.

After Manet sent the canvas to the 1864 Salon, he understood that he had made a considerably more noteworthy departure from the content, delineating Christ's injury on an inappropriate side. Regardless of Charles Baudelaire's notice that he would "give the pernicious something to giggle at," the artist didn't right his error. Pundits, in fact, reproved the image, particularly the authenticity of Christ's wasted body.

Completed in: 1864

Style: Impressionism, Modern Art

Measurements: 179 cm × 150 cm

Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York)

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Édouard Manet

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