Cart
{[{jc.cart.data.item_count}]} product products
There are no products in your cart!
{[{ item.product_title }]}
{[{ item.variant_title }]}
{[{ item.price }]}
{[{ item.original_price }]}
Subtotal
{[{ jc.cart.data.total_price }]}
{[{jc.cart.data.total_discount}]}
A Man Surfing Ocean Wave Art

A Man Surfing [Museum Quality Fine Art Prints]

Sale
$18.00

Unavailable Available Only few left Out of stock Pre-order
1788106|fine-art|8x8|none
Art print
ATX Fine Arts

A Man Surfing On The Ocean 

The Ocean

The oceans make up 70 percent of the planet and contain 97 percent of all the water on Earth. It also makes up the vast majority of water stores the majority of the planet’s moisture, terrestrial energy, and heat from the Sun. This energy is transferred between the equator and the two poles by larger surface currents by winds and deep ocean currents driven by differences in ocean density. It also provides the moisture and energy for storm systems and ultimately global climates. The oceans are an essential part of Earth’s water cycle. Since they cover so much of the planet, most evaporation comes from the ocean and most precipitation falls on the oceans. The oceans are also home to an enormous amount of life. That is, they have tremendous biodiversity. Tiny ocean plants create the base of a food web that supports all sorts of life forms. Marine life makes up the majority of all biomass on Earth. (Biomass is the total mass of living organisms in a given area.) These organisms supply us with food and even the oxygen created by marine plants.

To better understand regions of the ocean, scientists define the water column by depth. They divide the entire ocean into two zones vertically, based on the light level. Large lakes are divided into similar regions. Sunlight only penetrates the sea surface to a depth of about 200 m, creating the photic zone (consisting of the Sunlight Zone and Twilight Zone). Organisms that photosynthesize depend on sunlight for food and so are restricted to the photic zone. Since tiny photosynthetic organisms, known as phytoplankton, supply nearly all of the energy and nutrients to the rest of the marine food web, most other marine organisms live in or at least visit the photic zone. In the aphotic zone (consisting of the Midnight Zone and the Abyss) there is not enough light for photosynthesis. The aphotic zone makes up the majority of the ocean, but has a relatively small amount of its life, both in the diversity of type and in numbers.

Wave Art

Ocean water is constantly in motion: north-south, east-west, alongshore, and vertically. Seawater motions are the result of waves, tides, and currents. Ocean movements are the consequence of many separate factors: wind, tides, Coriolis effect, water density differences, and the shape of the ocean basins. Waves have been discussed in previous chapters in several contexts: seismic waves traveling through the planet, sound waves traveling through seawater, and ocean waves eroding beaches. Waves transfer energy and the size of a wave and the distance it travels depends on the amount of energy that it carries. Ocean waves originate from steady winds or high storm winds over the water. Sometimes these winds are far from where the ocean waves are seen. The largest wind waves form when the wind is very strong, blows steadily for a long time, and blows over a long distance. The wind could be strong, but if it gusts for just a short time, large waves won’t form. Wind blowing across the water transfers energy to that water. The energy first creates tiny ripples that create an uneven surface for the wind to catch so that it may create larger waves. These waves travel across the ocean out of the area where the wind is blowing.

Remember that a wave is a transfer of energy. Water molecules in waves make circles or ellipses. Energy transfers between molecules but the molecules themselves mostly bob up and down in place. The Internet has a variety of animations to help explain the concept of wave action. In this animation, a water bottle bobs in a place like a water molecule. An animation of motion in wind waves from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Here is an animation of a deep water wave is seen here. Notice the circular motion of water as wave energy transfers through it. Compare that to the wave action in shallow waters using this animation. Waves break when they become too tall to be supported by their base. This can happen at sea but happens predictably as a wave moves up ashore. The energy at the bottom of the wave is lost by friction with the ground so that the bottom of the wave slows down but the top of the wave continues at the same speed. The crest falls over and crashes down. Some of the damage done by storms is from storm surges. The water piles up at a shoreline as storm winds push waves into the coast. Storm surge may raise sea level as much as 7.5 m (25 ft), which can be devastating in a shallow land area when winds, waves, and rain are intense.

Tides are the daily rise and fall of sea level at any given place. The pull of the Moon’s gravity on Earth is the primary cause of tides and the pull of the Sun’s gravity on Earth is the secondary cause. The Moon has a greater effect because, although it is much smaller than the Sun, it is much closer. The Moon’s pull is about twice that of the Sun’s. To understand the tides it is easiest to start with the effect of the Moon on Earth. As the Moon revolves around our planet, its gravity pulls Earth toward it. The lithosphere is unable to move much but the water above it is pulled by the gravity and a bulge is created. This bulge is the high tide beneath the Moon. The Moon’s gravity then pulls the Earth toward it, leaving the water on the opposite side of the planet behind. This creates a second high tide bulge on the opposite side of Earth from the Moon. These two water bulges on opposite sides of the Earth aligned with the Moon are the high tides. Since so much water is pulled into the two high tides, low tides form between the two high tides. As the Earth rotates beneath the Moon, a single spot will experience two high tides and two low tides every day. The tidal range is the difference between the ocean level at high tide and the ocean at low tide. The tidal range in a location depends on a number of factors, including the slope of the seafloor. Water appears to move a greater distance on a gentle slope than on a steep slope.

Waves are additive so when the gravitational pull of the Sun and Moon are in the same direction, the high tides add and the low tides add. Highs are higher and lows are lower than at other times through the month. These more extreme tides, with a greater tidal range, are called spring tides. Spring tides don’t just occur in the spring; they occur whenever the Moon is in a new-moon or full-moon phase, about every 14 days. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has a simple diagram of this process. Neap tides are tides that have the smallest tidal range, and they occur when the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun form a 90-degree angle. They occur exactly halfway between the spring tides when the Moon is at first or last quarter. How do the tides add up to create neap tides? The Moon’s high tide occurs in the same place as the Sun’s low tide and the Moon’s low tide in the same place as the Sun’s high tide. At neap tides, the tidal range relatively small.

Ocean water moves in predictable ways along the ocean surface. Surface currents can flow for thousands of kilometers and can reach depths of hundreds of meters. These surface currents do not depend on the weather; they remain unchanged even in large storms because they depend on factors that do not change. Surface currents are created by three things: global wind patterns, the rotation of the Earth, and the shape of the ocean basins. Surface currents are extremely important because they distribute heat around the planet and are a major factor influencing climate around the globe. Thermohaline circulation drives deep ocean circulation. Thermo means heat and haline refers to salinity. Differences in temperature and in salinity change the density of seawater. So thermohaline circulation is the result of density differences in water masses because of their different temperature and salinity. What is the temperature and salinity of very dense water? Lower temperature and higher salinity yield the densest water. When a volume of water is cooled, the molecules move less vigorously so the same number of molecules takes up less space and the water is denser. If salt is added to a volume of water, there are more molecules in the same volume so the water is denser. Changes in temperature and salinity of seawater take place at the surface. Water becomes dense near the poles. Cold polar air cools the water and lowers its temperature, increasing its salinity. Fresh water freezes out of seawater to become sea ice, which also increases the salinity of the remaining water. This very cold, very saline water is very dense and sinks. This sinking is called downwelling.

A Man Surfing Art Print

A Man Surfing Wall Art Print

Our fine art prints are just the way to add that beautiful finishing touch to a room! Printed on archival quality paper and a perfect matte finish for framing.

• Printed on Breathing Color Pura Smooth paper (archival quality)
• 300gsm weight
• Matte finish, no surface glare
• Printed by an 11 colour Epson printer using Epson Ultrachrome HDX inks
• Inks are museum quality and feature print permanence ratings of up to 200 years
• Resistant to humidity, UV and atmospheric ozone

A Man Surfing - Ocean Wave Art - Simple Wave Art - Original Fine Art Prints For Sale - Ocean Wave Wall Art -Ocean Wall Art.
A Man SurfingA Man Surfing - Ocean Wave Art - Simple Wave Art - Original Fine Art Prints For Sale - Ocean Wave Wall Art -Ocean Wall ArtA Man Surfing Ocean Wave Artart-printBuy Surfing Wall ArtBuy Surfing Wall Art | Original Fine Art For Sale Online!Original Fine Art Prints For Salewall-art

Recently Viewed Products

Click to edit the product in Ali Orders.
Note: only show for shop owner