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Sky Paintings On Canvas For Sale
Dawit Abeza
Sky Paintings On Canvas For Sale

Sky Paintings On Canvas For Sale

Famous Sky Prints For Sale

The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh

The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh

The Starry Night is an oil-on-canvas painting by Vincent van Gogh, a Dutch Post-Impressionist painter. It portrays the view from his asylum room's east-facing window immediately before sunrise in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in June 1889, with the addition of an artificial settlement.

Since 1941, it has been part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, thanks to the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest. The Starry Night is widely regarded as Van Gogh's magnum masterpiece and one of the most well-known paintings in Western art. Although Van Gogh wrote a great number of letters, he mentioned very little about The Starry Night.

Van Gogh addressed the work in a letter to Theo on or around September 20, 1889, when he included it in a list of paintings he was sending to his brother in Paris, referring to it as a "night study," after noting that he had painted a starry sky in June.

The Course of Empire - Destruction by Thomas Cole

The Course of Empire - Destruction by Thomas Cole

Thomas Cole painted The Course of Empire - Destruction in 1836, an oil-on-canvas painting depicting the capture of an imperial metropolis by a barbarian horde. At the lower right-hand side of the canvas, a massive marble statue raises a bronze shield with his left hand, symbolizing the imperial state's martial glory.

Barbarians descend from their warships and rush up the stairs to the monument, as a swarm of injured and dying people crowd around the beheaded statue's fallen head. A woman, dressed in an expensive white gown, tries to leap from the wharf's edge into the estuary below, but an enemy soldier snatches her by her red cloak.

Another lady, kneeling on the steps next to her infant child's lifeless body, throws out her arms as a barbarian grabs her hair. From his perch atop the plinth, an archer, part of the city's defenses, is poised to fire an arrow at the enemy.

View of Delft by Johannes Vermeer

View of Delft by Johannes Vermeer

Constable created a number of oil paintings of the Dorset coast during his honeymoon in 1816, including two sketches of Bowleaze Cove in Weymouth Bay.

Later, based on one of those outdoor sketches, he created this show painting (now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London). He represented the bay's curvature, with a cliff in the foreground and hills beyond, as well as a dense cloud mass over the sea as it approached the coast.

The hills and the bay are lit up by sunlight passing through the sky. Between 1819 and 1830, Constable added strips of canvas to the top and left of his original work to give it a larger expanse of water and sky.

The Cliffs at Etretat by Claude Monet

The Cliffs at Etretat by Claude Monet

Etretat, in the Caux region of Normandy, was a source of inspiration for Monet, whom he visited every year between 1883 and 1886. He first saw the area in 1868 and was immediately attracted in by how picturesque it was, producing more than 50 works as a result. However, he only painted the Manneporte twice, the largest of the three "Gates" arches.

Monet met with Guy de Maupassant, a prominent 19th-century French writer who is frequently regarded as one of the "fathers" of the contemporary short tale, on a regular basis when this piece was made in c. 1885.

Many of Maupassant's paintings were sold in Etretat, where he was living at the time. Monet's paintings of these massive cliffs and his love of the Normandy coast reflected his thoughts and feelings. These iconic cliffs, known as the "Elephant and the Needle" because to their rock formations, are painted by Monet in a typical Impressionist style, including atmospheric circumstances and light effects.

Separate brushstrokes paired with brilliant colors are used to create the appearance of movement on the sea. Monet was known for painting one color over another while the first was still wet, as evidenced by the setting sun in this work. The painting was completed over the winter months, which presented the artist with a lot of challenges, including the weather, challenging terrain, and shifting tides.

The Fighting Temeraire by J. M. W. Turner

The Fighting Temeraire by J. M. W. Turner

The 98-gun HMS Temeraire, one of the last second-rate ships of the line to participate in the Battle of Trafalgar, is depicted in the artwork being towed up the Thames by a paddle-wheel steam tug in 1838, towards its final berth in Rotherhithe to be broken up for scrap.

The antique warship, the most important item in the painting, is positioned much to the left of the painting, where it rises in stately splendor and almost ghostlike colors against a triangle of blue sky and rising mist that throws it into relief. The historic ship's grandeur contrasts with the dirty blackened tugboat's tall chimney, which churns the normally calm river surface. The blue triangle frames the second triangle of masted ships that grow smaller as they get further away.

A small river vessel with a gaff-rigged sail barely catching a breeze has passed Temeraire and tugboat. A square-rigger floats beyond this, its sails fully extended. Further down the river, another small vessel appears as a patch of white. A three-masted ship rides at anchor in the distance, beyond a second tugboat making its way towards them. The stranded ships demonstrate sail's demise.

The Sunsets above the estuary on the opposite side of the painting from Temeraire, at the same distance from the frame as the ship's mainmast. Its rays reach into the clouds above it and across the water's surface. The sun setting symbolizes the end of an era, as the red of the clouds reflects in the river, echoing the color of the tugboat's smoke.

The Ninth Wave by Ivan Aivazovsky

The Ninth Wave by Ivan Aivazovsky

The title is a reference to an old sailing idiom that refers to a massive wave that follows a series of ever-larger waves. It depicts a sea after a night storm, with individuals facing death clinging to damaged ship debris in an attempt to preserve themselves.

The debris, which looks to be in the shape of a cross, appears to be a Christian symbol for salvation from earthly sin. Warm tones in the artwork lessen the sea's seeming ominous connotations, making the possibility of the humans surviving appear possible. Nature's destructiveness and beauty are both depicted in this painting.

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