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Sea Paintings On Canvas For Sale
Dawit Abeza
Sea Paintings On Canvas For Sale

Sea Paintings On Canvas For Sale

Famous Sea Prints For Sale

The Ninth Wave by Ivan Aivazovsky

The Ninth Wave by Ivan Aivazovsky

The Ninth Wave, Aivazovsky's most famous work, is a massive painting measuring nearly 11 feet (3.3 meters) by 7 feet (2.2 meters) that depicts a group of people clinging to flotsam from a damaged ship in the middle of a stormy sea surrounded by the dazzling gold tones of the morning.

The title alludes to a traditional maritime concept that the ninth wave is the final, greatest, and deadliest in a sequence, after which the cycle repeats.It was painted while Aivazovsky was 33 years old, and in technique, concept, and mass appeal, it typifies his mature Romanticism.

The Christian message is less explicit, confined to the cross-like shape of the mast and the begging expression of the unfortunates clinging to it moments before the enormous wave strikes, as they look to the rising sun.

The Ninth Wave has all the melodrama of Aivazovsky at his most febrile and all the grandeur of his most strident efforts to impress, displaying the classical academic discipline of composition and palette that Aivazovsky had been taught and then observed in the galleries and salons of European capitals.The epic quality, which had grown "increasingly prominent" at this stage, according to Russophile writer and poet Rosa Newmarch in her astute early comments on his writing, did not yet consistently offer the more "truthful vision" of which she considered Aivazovsky capable.

The Fighting Temeraire by J. M. W. Turner

The Fighting Temeraire by J. M. W. Turner

The 98-gun HMS Temeraire, one of the last second-rate ships of the line to participate in the Battle of Trafalgar, is depicted in the artwork being towed up the Thames by a paddle-wheel steam tug in 1838, towards its final berth in Rotherhithe to be broken up for scrap.

The artist left the picture to the nation in 1851, and it now hangs in the National Gallery in London. The antique vessel, which is positioned considerably to the left of the painting, rises in stately splendor and almost ghostlike colors against a triangle of blue sky and rising mist that throws it into relief. The historic ship's grandeur contrasts with the dirty blackened tugboat's tall chimney, which churns the normally calm river surface.

The blue triangle frames a second triangle of masted ships that grow smaller as they get further away. A small river vessel with a gaff-rigged sail barely catching a breeze has passed Temeraire and tugboat. A square-rigger floats beyond this, its sails fully extended. Further down the river, another small vessel appears as a patch of white. A three-masted ship rides at anchor in the distance, beyond a second tugboat making its way towards them. The stranded ships demonstrate sail's demise.

The Sunsets above the estuary on the opposite side of the painting from Temeraire, at the same distance from the frame as the ship's mainmast. Its rays reach into the clouds above it and across the water's surface. The river reflects the crimson of the clouds, which matches the color of the tugboat's smoke. The setting of the sun signifies the end of an era.

The Gulf Stream by Winslow Homer

The Gulf Stream by Winslow Homer

Homer was fascinated by the ocean's power, and he often used it as the subject of his paintings, whether at home on the Maine coast or while traveling.

The Gulf Stream is named after a powerful Atlantic current that ran across many of his favorite painting locations. After crossing the Gulf Stream several times, Homer based this dramatic vision of impending doom on sketches and watercolors he had created during winter travels to the Bahamas in 1884 and 1898.

A man is trapped aboard a dismasted, rudderless fishing boat with only a few stalks of sugarcane to keep him alive, as sharks and a distant waterspout threaten him. He is completely ignorant to the schooner on the horizon to his left, which Homer later put to the composition as a sign of hope. The artwork, which was completed shortly after his father's death in 1898, has been viewed as a depiction of the artist's assumed sense of mortality and vulnerability.

The Gulf Stream also alluded to some of the era's more complex social and political themes, such as war, slavery's legacy, and American imperialism, as well as more universal worries about human life's fragility and nature's domination.

The Raft of the Medusa by Théodore Géricault

The Raft of the Medusa by Théodore Géricault

The Raft of the Medusa, a painting by French Romantic artist Théodore Géricault depicting survivors of a shipwreck adrift and famished on a raft, was painted in 1819.

The Raft of the Medusa contains elements of historical painting traditions in both subject matter and dramatic presentation, and it symbolizes a departure from the Neoclassical school's calm and order. Géricault's work drew a lot of attention from the start and was eventually shown in London.

It was purchased by the Louvre shortly after the artist's death at the age of 32. Eugène Delacroix, J. M. W. Turner, Gustave Courbet, and Édouard Manet were all influenced by the picture.

The Sea at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer by Vincent van Gogh

The Sea at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer by Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh painted a series of paintings in 1888 depicting Saintes-Maries. When Van Gogh was living in Arles, he visited Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer on the Mediterranean Sea and painted both seascape and town works.

He utilized green and yellow for the waves in addition to the blue and white he brushed onto the canvas with forceful strokes. He used a palette knife to apply these colors, perfectly recreating the illusion of light passing over the waves.

Van Gogh was enthralled by the Mediterranean Sea's vibrant colors. It "has a color like a mackerel, in other words, changeable – you never know if it's green or purple – you never know if it's blue – because a second later, its changing reflection has taken on a pink or grey hue," he wrote. The brilliant red signature is prominently displayed in the foreground as if it were a ‘red note in the green.'

The Red Buoy by Paul Signac

The Red Buoy by Paul Signac

Paul Signac was a painter who also loved to sail. He painted several seascapes, including a series of views of the harbor of Saint-Tropez, where he settled in 1892. The eye is drawn to the brilliant red-orange buoy, which contrasts with the deep blue of the water in this vertical artwork.

The viewer's eye is then drawn to the background, which has softer tones due to the reflections of the buildings. Signac was able to show a glistening sea and the Midi's glistening light using the divisionist approach and a blend of pure hues.

The scientific dimension of the divisionist artists' work sets them apart from the impressionists. In comparison to his earlier work, Signac's strokes have enlarged for this series, and the tone separation has become freer. Signac traveled extensively around the European coast as a sailor, sketching the landscapes he saw. He painted scenes of Paris, Viviers, and other French places in his final years.

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee by Rembrandt

The Storm on the Sea of Galilee by Rembrandt

The Storm in the Sea of Galilee is a painting based on a biblical account of Jesus and His disciples being caught in a storm while out on the sea in their boat. Rembrandt Van Rijn created the artwork in 1632. The disciples in the Bible were in a state of frenzy and panic as they faced death, but their teacher Jesus slept quietly.

The pounding sea waves, not to mention the boat's violent motion as a result of the storm, made His followers shout. Rembrandt presents this as an evolving pictorial drama from the Bible on canvas in a lovely and artistic way. The picture is a jumble of powerful and dark strokes that represent darkness as well as the approaching tragedy that hung over the passengers on the boat.

The contrast in light colors of the sea waves and a little portion of the sky with the blackness enveloping the live forms on the boat is optically appealing and immediately draws the viewer's attention. The boat is represented in a semi-capsized state, and one can almost sense the disciples' distress as some are depicted frantically trying to stir the oars and harness the sailcloth in a desperate bid to save the boat from sinking.

The Storm at Sea by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

The Storm at Sea by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

One of Bruegel's final works is Storm at Sea. It's incomplete, and like so many of his works, it defies easy interpretation. On the one side, we see ships being endangered by a storm - man, in other words, not as the lord of Nature, but as its victim.

The sailors, on the other hand, have put oil on the water to calm the sea and sacrificed a barrel from their cargo to divert the enormous whale's attention. However, the barrel could be read to suggest that animals, including humans, allow themselves to get distracted by little issues rather than pursuing what is truly important.

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