Cart
{[{jc.cart.data.item_count}]} product products
There are no products in your cart!
{[{ item.product_title }]}
{[{ item.variant_title }]}
{[{ item.price }]}
{[{ item.original_price }]}
Subtotal
{[{ jc.cart.data.total_price }]}
{[{jc.cart.data.total_discount}]}
Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec Extraordinary Life Biography
Dawit Abeza
Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec Extraordinary Life Biography

Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec Extraordinary Life Biography

Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec was a 19th-century French painter and an accomplished artist. He was noted for his famous works like 'The Streetwalker', 'Reine de Joie', 'The laundress', and 'At the Moulin Rouge.' Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec was the first artist who used his fine art skills to promote advertising. This was a remarkable shift in the history of art, erasing the limits between high (painting, drawing, sculpture) and low (posters, logos and other forms of visual culture) art. We recognize that some of his renowned masterpieces were posters for nightclubs, however, that does not in any way reduce their value. On the contrary, it set a high standard for future commercial artists like Alphonse Mucha to Andy Warhol.

Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec Portrait

Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec Portrait

Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec Paintings

At the Moulin Rouge by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

At the Moulin Rouge by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

At the Moulin Rouge, exemplified Parisian nightlife at the closure of the nineteenth century. The composition is remarked for its daring style, dramatic manner, and combination of dark and loud colors. The Moulin Rouge is one of the most popular nightspots of the Montmartre region. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec utilized his acute skills of observation in creating this masterpiece. The wondrous red-orange hair of the entertainer Jane Avril is the focal point of the centrally seated crowd. The painting incorporates two joined parts: a short main canvas and an L-shaped board to the lower and right corners. The painting was divided after the artist’s death, maybe by his dealer (to make the painting less radical and more saleable), and it was restored sometime before 1914.

Reine de Joie by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Reine de Joie by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Symbolic of the uneasy relations between the upper-class and working-class residents of Paris, Reine de Joie represents Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s artistic spirit and interest in the social-cultural. Designed to promote a novel of the same title by Victor Joze, the lithograph contains bold expanses of color depicting a picture in which the two central characters have reached an understanding on the nature of their relationship. The man, a well-known banker, has accepted to offer the woman access to his wealth in return for nothing more than her partnership. This scenario presents an unusual twist on the typical activities that took place between wealthy men and their lower-class female equivalents.

The Streetwalker by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

The Streetwalker by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

As early as 1901, the woman in this composition was classified as a streetwalker. Her actual name has been forgotten in history; only the nickname La Casque d'Or which means Golden Helmet, which of course refers to her wig. The central character remains seated in the garden of Monsieur Forest, near Lautrec's neighbor in Montmartre.

The laundress by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

The laundress by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

One of a group of portraits of Carmen Gaudin done by Toulouse-Lautrec throughout his Paris years, The Laundress is intended to reveal the raw, dark, and gritty nature of the working-class woman. Toulouse-Lautrec poses the prostitute - one of his favorite models - as a laundress, taking a break from her physically intense and exhausting work. While Toulouse-Lautrec was notorious for wanting to exhibit the hardship of Parisian life, there is a subtle delight and passion to this work that belies his passion for this woman and her toils. This naturalism and painterly method is the foundation of Toulouse-Lautrec's earlier works.

Most Frequently Asked Questions About Henri de Toulouse Lautrec

Was the Moulin Rouge a real place?

Yes, The Moulin Rouge was established in 1889 by Joseph Oller (1839-1922) and Charles Zidler (1831-1897). At the start of the business, the Moulin Rouge would launch champagne-filled parties during which popular dancers performed. It was also throughout this time that the world-renowned quartet known as the French Cancan was born.

When was Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec born?

On November twenty-four, 1864, in Albi, France. Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec was born into the aristocracy family.

What are some of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec skills?

Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec was a Post-Impressionist painter, he also went on to make innovations in lithograph drawing. He became extremely noted for his posters, which were influenced by Japanese designs.

Why is Henri de Toulouse Lautrec important?

Physically incapable of engaging in many exercises enjoyed by his male counterparts at his age, Toulouse-Lautrec submerged himself in art. He became an influential Post-Impressionist painter, art nouveau illustrator, and lithographer, and, through his works, designated numerous details of the late-19th-century bohemian lifestyle in Paris.

What does Toulouse mean?

Pronounced (to͞o-lo͞oz′) Is a city of southern France on the Garonne River, southeast of Bordeaux. Originally part of Roman Gaul, it was the capital of the Visigoths during 418-508. Toulouse was also a social hub for medieval Europe.

So how tall was Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec?

Four feet and 8 inches.

What did Toulouse Lautrec die of?

Syphilis

Henri de Toulouse Lautrec Posters

Poster Advertising Aristide Bruant in His Cabaret at the Ambassadeurs, 1892 Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Unlike his paintings, which tend to investigate and present intimate interplays and rough, everyday circumstances, his posters displayed the whimsical nature of Parisian nightlife. Given Toulouse-Lautrec’s inclination to attend Montmartre’s nightclubs, it is no shock that nightclubs constitute the bulk of his commissions.

Toulouse-Lautrec Was In The Entertainment Business.

In opposition to nearly all of the other artists in his circle, Toulouse-Lautrec had no problem making a living. This is mainly because Parisian business owners recognized they could make money from his unique (modern) vision posters. In contrast to artists who worked for private collectors, galleries or the government, he served for the entertainment business, where selling drinks and tickets was the bottom line. Jane Avril, one of his closest friends and one of Montmartre's most beloved cabaret dancers, later wrote: "It is more than certain that I owe him the fame that I enjoyed, dating from his first poster of me." More than simply an excellent advertiser and artist, Henri de Toulouse Lautrec was an influential open visual historian of urban life in Belle Epoque Paris.

Moulin Rouge Film (1952)

Moulin Rouge Film 1952

Moulin Rouge is a 1952 British drama movie directed by John Huston, produced by John and James Woolf for their Romulus Films company and published by United Artists. The movie is set in Paris in the late 19th century, following artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec in the city's bohemian subculture in and around the burlesque palace, the Moulin Rouge.

Moulin Rouge! Movie In 2001

Moulin Rouge 2001 film

Moulin Rouge movie (2001) Is jukebox musical romantic drama film directed, co-produced, and co-written by Baz Luhrmann. It represents the story of a young English poet/writer, Christian (Ewan McGregor), who falls in love with the star of the Moulin Rouge, cabaret actress and courtesan Satine (Nicole Kidman). It uses the artistic setting of the Montmartre Quarter of Paris, France.

Henri de Toulouse Lautrec Museum

Henri de Toulouse Lautrec Museum

In 1922, the Toulouse-Lautrec Museum was introduced in the prestigious atmosphere of the Palais de la Berbie. In an endowment from the parents of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, the museum houses a comprehensive public collection of his art, in devote to Henri de Toulouse Lautrec. The paintings, lithographs, and drawings, along with all the posters ever made by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, are notable illustrations of every side of his talented and innovative abilities.

Henri de Toulouse Lautrec Prints

-La Troupe de Mademoiselle Eglantine - Henri de Toulouse- Lautrec

Lautrec’s prints regularly present dazzling technical effects, as new shifts in lithography during the late nineteenth century allowed larger prints, more diverse colors, and nuanced surfaces. The Henri de Toulouse Lautrec generally applied the spattered-ink technique known as crachis, marked in his series of prints depicting Loïe Fuller (1970.534). Fuller was an American famous in fin-de-siècle Paris for her shows mixing dance, bright artificial lights, and music. Lautrec composed about sixty versions of this print in a variety of colored inks, including gold and silver.

Jane Avril Print

Jane Avril Print

Jane Avril, a lifelong friend of the artist, commissioned this print to boost her nightclub show at the Jardin de Paris in 1893. Lautrec’s bold style is distinguished by a radically skewed outlook, sharp cropping, leveled forms, and curved lines—such as those representing Avril’s frilly dress. The “cancan” kick of Avril’s leg, one of her trademark dance moves, finds a social echo in the upward momentum of the double-bass, clasped by an obscure musician. To design this print, Lautrec used numerous lithographic stones, one for each color—inky black, acidic orange, yellow, and green.

Toulouse-Lautrec Syndrome

Toulouse-Lautrec syndrome is an unusual genetic disease that is thought to affect about 1 in 1.7 million people worldwide. It is named after the famous 19th-century French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. It has been said that Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec suffered from nanism or the Henri Toulouse-Lautrec Syndrome. Although other art historians have questioned whether this is true. Henri de Toulouse Lautrec endured painful toothaches and facial deformities throughout his life. Each of Toulouse-Lautrec’s femurs were broken throughout his teens, a condition believed to have contributed to his short height.

Toulouse-Lautrec's Emotional Suffering

Toulouse-Lautrec's Emotional Suffering

Henri de Toulouse Lautrec presented himself as a humorous, fun man, who famous beloved the city he lived in. Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, however, suffered greatly, due to his physical ailments, and past family trauma as a child. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was almost destroyed by a serious drinking problem and laid low with numerous sicknesses. Toulouse-Lautrec turned to alcohol to try to hide his pain and would ultimately drink himself into oblivion.

Death and heritage

Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec died on September nine, 1901, at the country house Malromé in Saint-André-du-Bois at thirty-six years old. Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec had over 700 canvas paintings, 350 prints and posters, and 5,000 drawings. Henri de Henri Toulouse-Lautrec is seen as a critical pioneer to a variety of art movements, as well as an iconic global artist.

Leave a comment