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Famous Paintings By Diego Rivera [Top 20 Art Masterpieces]
Dawit Abeza
Famous Paintings By Diego Rivera [Top 20 Art Masterpieces]

Famous Paintings By Diego Rivera [Top 20 Art Masterpieces]

Diego Rivera Self-portrait

Diego Rivera Self-portrait

Who was Diego Rivera?

Diego Rivera, was a noteworthy figure artist in twentieth-century. He was somewhat a political artists who started painting when he was just adolescence. He started  learning about art by going to Mexico's Academy of San Carlos when he was ten. He was associated with various governmental issues and he committed himself as a Marxist and joined the Mexican Communist Party in 1922. 

 

Diego Rivera Artworks - Mural Painter

The Best Diego Rivera Paintings 

  1. View of Toledo by Diego Rivera
  2. Zapatista Landscape –The Guerrilla by Diego Rivera
  3. Nude with Calla Lilies by Diego Rivera
  4. The Day of the Dead by Diego Rivera
  5. Man at the Crossroads by Diego Rivera
  6. The Detroit Industry Fresco Cycle by Diego Rivera
  7. Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in Alameda Park by Diego Rivera
  8. Creation by Diego Rivera
  9. Motherhood –Angelina and the Child by Diego Rivera
  10. Frozen Assets by Diego Rivera
  11. Symbolic Landscape by Diego Rivera
  12. The Abundant Earth, Fertile Land, by Diego Rivera
  13. The Flower Carrier by Diego Rivera
  14. The Watermelons by Diego Rivera
  15. Retrato de Ignacio Sanchez by Diego Rivera
  16. Agrarian Leader Zapata by Diego Rivera
  17. Tenochtitlan Marketplace by Diego Rivera
  18. Sailor at Breakfast by Diego Rivera
  19. Peasants by Diego Rivera
  20. The History of Mexico by Diego Rivera

View of Toledo by Diego Rivera

View of Toledo by Diego Rivera

A stunning tribute to three of Rivera's favorite masters: El Greco, Francisco Goya, and Paul Cézanne. View of Toledo exemplifies Rivera's tendency to unite traditional and more modern approaches in his work. The landscape is a reworking of the famous 1597 landscape painting by El Greco, whose work Rivera studied during his time spent in Spain; Rivera's version even deploys the same viewpoint as the Spanish Old Master. At the same time, the subdued palette flattened forms, and unconventional use of perspective suggests the artist's reverence for Cézanne, in his "L'Estaque Landscapes". This artwork also documents the beginning of Rivera's Cubist phase.

Completed in: 1912

Style or Period: Cubism

Measurements: 112 cm x 91 cm

Location: Private Collection

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Zapatista Landscape –The Guerrilla by Diego Rivera

Zapatista Landscape –The Guerrilla by Diego Rivera

This painting is considered by many to be his greatest masterpiece, which he later described as "probably the most faithful expression of Mexican humor I have ever achieved". Elements of this still life include a sombrero, shotgun, cartridge belt, wooden ammo box, and the mountains of Mexico. The central image floats in space, its planes overlap.

What could be the shadow of the gun is painted white. The reds are very red, the blues are an intense and luxurious blue: like in Mexico.

In the lower right corner, there is an open white sheet of paper, attached to the canvas by a nail: it is a sort of manifesto of the millions of Mexicans who remained illiterate.

Completed in: 1915

Style or Period: Cubism

Location: Museo Nacional de Arte

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Nude with Calla Lilies by Diego Rivera

Nude with Calla Lilies by Diego Rivera

Also known as Desnudo con alcatraces.

Rivera frequently celebrated the relationship between peasants and nature. The calla lily is a sensual, sculptural flower and quintessential example of Mexico's exuberant flora. This kind of nature was celebrated many times by Rivera, particularly in frescoes depicted peasants with indigenous features carrying bundles or offerings of them.

he earlier periods of the Renaissance and Baroque movements did not cover flowers or nature other than as supporting features and it was only later that still, life painting became so frequent. The rise of landscape artists also helped to bring nature more into play across the art world.

The image represents a dark-skinned woman, hugging several calla lilies: a basket and a rug are on the floor.

The colors used are the warm color range.

The image gives us a feeling of beauty because there are elements such as the type of flower represented: The calla is a flower that means pleasure, beauty, durability, and the woman is completely naked, letting herself be admired.

Completed in: 1944

Style or Period: Art Deco

Measurements: 157 cm x 124 cm

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

The Day of the Dead by Diego Rivera

The Day of the Dead by Diego Rivera

Diego Rivera created his murals at the Ministry of Education from 1923 to 1928. His work was divided into two main spaces: the "Patio del Trabajo" and the "Patio de las Fiestas", in the latter one a tribute to various Mexican celebrations: popular, religious, and political, among which one of the most representatives stands out: the Day of the Dead.

A mural in which Diego Rivera captures a scene from this tradition which is celebrated in many homes and different parts of the world and which has been recognized internationally for its cultural value.

In this mural, you can see artists and famous people of the 1920s such as Juan Silver, Celia Montalván, Salvador Novo, Máximo Pacheco, Guadalupe Marín, Carmen Mondragón, and even Diego Rivera himself.

Completed in: 1924

Style or Period: Muralism

Measurements: 46.4 cm x 30 cm

Location: Secretariat of Public Education Main Headquarters, Mexico City, Mexico

Medium: Fresco

 

Man at the Crossroads by Diego Rivera

Man at the Crossroads by Diego Rivera

In the center was a worker who controlled the machinery. In front of him, a giant fist holding a sphere depicting the recombination of atoms and the division of cells From the central figure four helix-like shapes extend to the corner of the composition, depicting arcs of light created by giant lenses. , cosmological and biological forces were represented that represented the discoveries made possible by the telescope and the microscope.

Between and beyond the arches were scenes from modern social life. Women from wealthy society are seen playing cards and smoking, Lenin holding hands with a group of multiracial workers, soldiers and war machines, and a Russian May Day rally

The "profligate rich" watched over by the unemployed as the war raged, and a socialist utopia introduced by Lenin.

Gigantic classical statues present: On the left, an angry Jupiter, the one on the right was a seated Caesar without his head.

The lower part of the painting was to represent the controlled growth of natural resources, in the form of a variety of plants emerging from their roots, visible in a view cut below the ground.

Completed in: 1934

Style or Period: Mexican muralism

Measurements: 160 cm x 43 cm

Location: 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City

Medium: Fresco

 

The Detroit Industry Fresco Cycle by Diego Rivera

The Detroit Industry Fresco Cycle by Diego Rivera

Diego Rivera conceived his fresco cycle as a tribute to Detroit's manufacturing base and workforce. The project was financed by Henry Ford's son who was the president of the Ford Motor Company. Encompassing all four walls of the Garden Court in the museum, the 27 murals are rife with Christian themes and utopian symbolism.

The themes established on the east wall are continued on the west wall, where the technologies of the aviation, shipping, and pleasure boating are represented in the upper panels. The half-face in the central monochrome panel symbolizes both the coexistence of life and death as well as humanity's spiritual and physical aspects, while the star symbolizes aspirations and hope for civilization. This heraldic image introduces another major theme of the cycle: the dual qualities of human beings, nature, and technology. Vertical panels on each side of the west entrance to the court introduce the automobile industry theme through the representation of Power House No. I, the energy source for the Rouge complex.

Completed in: 1933

Style or Period: Mural

Location: Detroit Institute of Arts, US

Medium: Fresco

 

Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in Alameda Park by Diego Rivera

Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in Alameda Park by Diego Rivera

Alameda Park is Mexico City's first city park built on the grounds of an ancient Aztec market.

The mural represents three main periods of Mexican history: the conquest, the dictatorship, and the revolution of 1910. In chronological order, starting from left to right, we meet numerous prominent figures of Mexican history. At the center of the mural is Diego Rivera at the age of ten led by the hand of Dame Catrina.

A gentleman dressed in a black suit and derby hat: Posada, who stands to Dame Catrina's right and gallantly offers her his arm. Posada was highly respected by Rivera, who established him as one of his art teachers.

Through Dama Catrina the Aztec earth mother "Coatlicue" is represented here, wearing the feathered snake around her neck like a boa. His belt buckle displays the Aztec zodiac sign of "Ollin", which symbolizes perpetual movement.

The adjacent figure is Frida Kahlo in a traditional Mexican dress holding in her left hand the "Yin-Yang" symbol of duality taken from Chinese philosophy, which also represents the duality of pre-Columbian mythology.

Completed in: 1946 – 1947

Style or Period: Muralism

Measurements: 15.6 m × 4.7 m

Location: Museo Mural Diego Rivera, Mexico City, Mexico

Medium: Fresco

 

Creation by Diego Rivera

Creation by Diego Rivera

The main theme of the drawing was about religion and its beliefs. The design is made up of elements up to twelve feet high all related to the size of the design

The drawing is done using ancient tools which include molten wax on which pigments are applied. The main features of the design are humans on each side of the deep-colored frame that resembles an altar. At the highest point above all the features is the drawing of the sun. Three hands point away from the sun in different directions and this symbolizes the Divine Trinity.

At the base of the drawing are Eve and Adam both seated at opposite ends of the altar.

Unlike the rest of the other individuals, they are naked to resemble the Christian theme of disobedience.

Left-sided individuals represent love, hope, and faith. Right-sided individuals represent prudence, justice, and strength in belief.

Completed in: 1922

Style or Period: Muralism

Location: San Ildefonso College, Mexico City, Mexico

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Motherhood –Angelina and the Child by Diego Rivera

Motherhood –Angelina and the Child by Diego Rivera

It's among the most famous paintings that Diego Rivera ever created. The painting which shows the Russian mother Angelina Beloff breastfeeding her firstborn son was developed in 1916. The baby died of Influenza a few months later.

He uses different color paints to achieve the background which is not only simple but also keenly developed. His main focus is on the woman and her baby; he put shade on the light on them by mixing pieces to come up with an exceptional finish. The mother put one leg on top of the other to support the breastfeeding child which she manages.

All these details indicate that Diego did not have a hard time delivering the message. The cubism style has been well utilized. He knows exactly how to put the cubes together without distorting the image. The whole painting makes cubism to appear so easy, and yet it is known to be one of the most challenging painting styles.

Completed in: 1916

Style or Period: Cubist

Measurements: 132 cm x 86 cm

Location: Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil, Mexico City

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Frozen Assets by Diego Rivera

Frozen Assets by Diego Rivera

The painting combined his appreciation for New York's distinctive vertical architecture with a powerful critique of the city's economic inequities.

The top panel features a dramatic sequence of widely recognizable skyscrapers, most completed within a few years of Rivera's arrival in New York. In the middle section, a steel and glass shed serves as a shelter for rows of sleeping men, indicating the expropriated labor that made such extraordinary growth possible during a time of economic turmoil. Below, a bank waiting room houses a guard, a clerk, and a trio of figures eager to inspect their growing assets in the vault.

The painting demonstrated a keen view of New York's reality: the city is never just what can be seen. The gloomy and tense composition of the frescoes suggests a city imprisoned by the inevitability of history. The painting was tagged Frozen Assets by a visiting reporter and has kept that title ever since.

Completed in: 1931

Style or Period: Muralism

Measurements: 188.5 cm x 239 cm

Location: Dolores Olmedo Collection, Mexico City, Mexico

 

Symbolic Landscape by Diego Rivera

Symbolic Landscape by Diego Rivera

A fallen tree that almost comes to life occupying a large part of the painting and it takes on the sensual form of the bust of a woman with a bark that changes from smooth to rough, surrounded by a rough and jagged stone; The stone takes many forms including a man's face and clenched fists.

A bloody knife with a wedding ring has slipped on its horrible blade and a leather glove seems to evoke a dirty and completely out of place action in an otherwise natural landscape. In the distance, a full moon watches over the scene; The colors of the objects in the painting are very natural to the landscape, but at the same time expressive. The space in the artwork is quite crowded and full in the foreground, but it flattens out into the distance, with unsigned stones that look as if they're making an eternal journey towards the horizon.

Completed in: 1940

Style or Period: Symbolism

Measurements: 121.6 cm × 152.7 cm

Location: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

The Abundant Earth, Fertile Land, by Diego Rivera

The Abundant Earth, Fertile Land, by Diego Rivera

One of Rivera's most complex and successful mural cycles was painted in the former Jesuit chapel in Chapingo, which served as the auditorium of the Escuela Nacional de Agricultura.

The artist has devised a program of 41 fresco panels in which the socialist revolution parallels the evolution of nature. The two themes are mirrored along the opposite walls of the chapel and the images use symbolism drawn from Christian and Aztec culture.

The Abundant Earth is one of 41 fresco panels, which trace the development of natural growth from seed to a flowering plant.

The Abundant Earth is a symbolic painting that aims to remind humanity of its roots and also the respect and love that we should always have for the planet on which we live.

The abundance, specifically, is portrayed through the fruits that grow across the scene, with many of the figures enjoying some themselves. Rivera puts a thick background of foliage which delivers food aplenty for these lucky souls. Their lack of clothing also adds to this idea of being close to the start of man, where we had very little other than the planet itself.

Completed in: 1924 – 1927

Style or Period: Mural

Measurements: 46.99 cm x 62.23 cm

Location: Chapingo Autonomous University, Texcoco, Mexico

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

The Flower Carrier by Diego Rivera

The Flower Carrier by Diego Rivera

The painting is a symbolic portrayal of the struggles of a worker in a modern, capitalistic world.

The peasant on the ground in the painting has a large basket filled with beautiful and bright pink and purple flowers inside of it. The basket is much larger than the peasant, and it appears to be weighing him down considerably. A woman is loading the basket onto his back, who is actually much larger than the peasant. She is wearing a purple top with a long orange pleated skirt that covers her legs completely. Behind them are leaves from bushes and the earth under them is brown. The colors of the two people and the flowers stand out completely from the background.

Completed in: 1935

Style or Period: Social realism

Measurements: 121.92 cm x 121.29 cm

Location: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

The Watermelons by Diego Rivera

The Watermelons by Diego Rivera

These brightly colored watermelons have an almost realistic texture, achieved by mixing a little sand with oil paint.

The death of his wife devastated him in 1954, he fell ill and died 3 years later. This painting was created in memory of his deceased wife.

Watermelons refer to the traditional Mexican feast "day of the dead" when relatives picture their dead feasting on watermelon and other favorite foods. On this day, Mexicans celebrate their dead rather than mourn them.

Watermelons are also the subject of Frida Kahlo's latest painting: "Viva la Vida, Watermelons," which came three years earlier in 1954 when she was most fond of still lifes paintings and regularly featured watermelons in a variety of arrangements.

Completed in: 1957

Style or Period: Social realism

Measurements: 68.7 cm x 92.7 cm

Location: Museum Dolores Olmedo Patiño

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Retrato de Ignacio Sanchez by Diego Rivera

Retrato de Ignacio Sanchez by Diego Rivera

Rivera was an artist of the people and for the people. This is a simple and beautiful masterpiece that shows how Rivera desired to paint the people that he saw around him.

He wanted to paint art that the people of his country would respond to and recognize themselves.

In this work, there are only a few colors and they repeat themselves. The little boy stares out at us with an innocent expression on his face of contentment. Although he is young there is something in his eyes as well that suggests he is perhaps older than his years. The way the boy is clasping his hands in front of him also makes him appear older; as a little old man even though he is clearly a small child of three or four. He is dressed simply. He looks like he is dressed to go out and work in the fields alongside his parents. His face is framed by the large hat he wears.

Completed in: 1927

Style or Period: Social realism

Measurements: 39 cm x 79 cm

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Agrarian Leader Zapata by Diego Rivera

Agrarian Leader Zapata by Diego Rivera

With Diego Rivera and Mexican muralism, painting acquires a new meaning, a new function. The artist, who in modernity stops reproducing the world outside himself to express his inner world, his own truth and vision of the world, now uses art as a means to spread his political ideas, the ideals of the Revolution.

Rivera integrates revolutionary ideology into painting. Art must denounce the problems of the time, the injustices suffered by people. At the same time, it must recover cultural roots to reaffirm identity.

In this mural Emiliano Zapata, defender of agrarian reform and protagonist of the Revolution, appears at the head of a group of peasants who carry their agricultural tools as weapons, just as you can easily observe in detail the scythe that carries Zapata: his tool it is a weapon, but at the same time it is the symbol of communism.

Despite his humility and scarce resources, Zapata is portrayed by Rivera as the greatest hero, glorified alongside a magnificent white steed. A true hero of the people.

Completed in: 1931

Style or Period: Realism

Measurements: 238.1 cm x 188 cm

Location: The Museum of Modern Art in New York City

Medium: Fresco

 

Tenochtitlan Marketplace by Diego Rivera

Tenochtitlan Marketplace by Diego Rivera

Tenochtitlan is a city located in the middle of Lake Texcoco, founded in 1345 by the Aztecs, it was built on the spot where they saw an eagle perched on a cactus while eating a snake.

It became an impressive city made up of temples, pyramids, palaces, and a huge market.

This city with its market and citizens is skillfully represented by Rivera in his famous painting.

Rivera's Tenochtitlan Market is "an encyclopedic presentation of the many products, services, activities and characters that can be seen in the great Aztec market. The painting gives no hint of Aztec imperialism, which the market symbolizes. Victims of tribute and sacrifice. they were brought to Tenochtitlan.

Completed in: 1945

Style or Period: History painting

Location: National Palace of Mexico

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Sailor at Breakfast by Diego Rivera

Sailor at Breakfast by Diego Rivera

In this painting, Wassily Kandinsky's theoretical concepts can be perceived.

The work represents the image of a sailor in three perspectives or planes that break up the image through geometric shapes such as rectangles, squares, and circles, and represents the concept of home; the author was studying in France when he realized this painting.

The blue color evokes the sea as well as the natural forms that are represented through the fish on the plate, horizontal lines of blue color recall also the uniform characteristic of a French sailor.

It is a very warm work for the management of yellow and earth tones with little lighting in the background but in its central part, it has a light effect due to the small planes in white and lighter shades generating at the same time contrast and cold feeling.

Completed in: 1914

Style or Period: Cubism

Measurements: 117 cm x 72 cm

Location: 117 cm x 72 cm

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

Peasants by Diego Rivera

Peasants by Diego Rivera

Rivera looked to represent the individuals of Mexico through painting, and he captured the country's essence. In the painting Peasants, the workers reflect Mexico's culture, people, struggle, and even its social and political structure. The simple image of a peasant can be both specific and universal. Any daughter of industry or son of agriculture could look at that painting and see Mexico. By covering a deep yet simplistic meaning in his paintings, Rivera often unified his people through his art.

Completed in: 1931

Style or Period: Landscape

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

The History of Mexico by Diego Rivera

The History of Mexico by Diego Rivera

the mural depicts the entire history of Mexico from the ancient days, showing Mexico's struggles against the French, the Spanish, and other invaders, from the perspective of the Mexican people. Designed to justify the Mexican revolution that happened not long before, and also to promote the current government of the time and the new life they promised Mexico.

The North Wall depicts the ancient Aztec people and their culture, crafts, and lifestyle in ancient Mexico; the western wall, which is the main wall of the mural, shows the history of Mexico in conflicts, revolutions, and wars, showing how Mexico developed; The southern wall shows the bright future of Mexico, with industry, education, prosperity, and socialist teachings. The mural depicts many people involved in Mexico's history and revolution, including Diego Rivera's wife, Frida Kahlo.

Completed in: 1929 - 1935

Style or Period: Muralism

Location: Palacio Nacional, Mexico City, Mexico

Medium: Fresco

Diego Rivera's Sugar Cane

 

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Comments

Maria Loya
Grandioso !!!!

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