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10 Famous Impressionist Artists and Paintings
Dawit Abeza
10 Famous Impressionist Artists and Paintings

10 Famous Impressionist Artists and Paintings

What is impressionism art?

Impressionism was born out of a group of Paris-based artists, whose unconventional exhibitions helped them rise to fame in the 1870s-1880s.

Art critics at the time rejected the famous impressionist artists on this list. Impressionism was a radical departure from traditional realistic works of the time.

Top 10 Famous Impressionist Artists

  1. Paul Cézanne
  2. Claude Monet
  3. Édouard Manet
  4. Berthe Morisot
  5. Edgar Degas
  6. Mary Cassatt
  7. Pierre-Auguste Renoir
  8. Camille Pissarro
  9. Gustave Caillebotte
  10. Alfred Sisley

 

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne's work laid the foundations for the transition from the 19th-century artistic endeavor to a new, radically different art world in the 20th-century. Cezanne is believed to have bridged the gap between the late 19th-century and 20th-century.

Cezanne's repetitive and exploratory brushstrokes, which are often repeated, are easily recognizable. Cezanne used small brushstrokes and planes of color to create complex fields.

Cezanne's work was repeatedly rejected by the Salon in Paris, and mocked by art critics when it was exhibited alongside the Impressionists. Cezanne's works were still considered to be a masterpiece by the younger artists who visited his Aix studio.

Picasso, Braque, and Metzinger were inspired by Cezanne's explorations in geometric simplification and optical phenomena. They also encouraged Gleizes and Gris to explore more complicated views of the same subject, eventually leading to the fracturing form.

Cezanne's pioneering artistic inquiry would have profoundly influenced the development of modern art.

 

The Card Players

 

The Card Players is a collection of oil paintings that Cezanne created during his time. There are five versions. They vary in size and reflect the number of players and the location where the game is played. Cezanne also did numerous studies and drawings in preparation of The Card Players Series.

 

Claude Monet

Claude Monet

Oscar-Claude Monet, a French painter who was one of the founders of impressionism.

Monet is regarded as a major precursor to modernism art. He was particularly known for his efforts to portray nature as he saw it. He was the most prolific and consistent practitioner of impressionism's philosophy, which is about expressing one's views before nature. This included Plein Air (outdoor) landscape paintings.

Monet was born in Le Havre (Normandy) and began to draw and explore the outdoors at an early age. His mother Louise-Justine Aubree Monet supported him in his desire to become a painter. However, his father, Claude Adolphe, disagreed and encouraged him to pursue a business career.  

Impression, Sunrise

Impression, Sunrise

Impression, Sunrise was shown for the first time at the "Exhibition of the Impressionists" in Paris, April 1874. It is believed that the painting inspired the name of the impressionist movement.

Sunrise, Impression displays The port of Le Havre, Monet's hometown. It can now be seen at the Musee Marmottan in Paris.

 

Édouard Manet

Édouard Manet

Edouard Manet was a French modernist artist. He was one of the first artists of the 19th century to paint modern life and a key figure in the transition from Realism to Impressionism.

Manet was born into an upper-class family with strong political connections. He rejected the future envisioned for him and instead became obsessed with the world of painting and created his own vision.

Manet spent the last 20 years of his life building relationships with other great artists and developing his style, which would be hailed as an innovation and a major influence on future painters.

A Bar at the Folies-Bergere

A Bar at the Folies-Bergere

A Bar at the Folies-Bergere is believed to be his final major work. It was created in 1882 and exhibited at the Paris salon. It shows a scene from the Folies Bergere Paris nightclub. 

Berthe Morisot

Berthe Morisot

Berthe Marie Pauline Morisot, a French painter, was part of the Paris circle of painters who were known as the Impressionists. Morisot was one of the first female painters to exhibit at the highly regarded Salon de Paris in 1864.

The works at the Salon were judged annually by Academicians in Paris. Eugene Manet was her husband and colleague.

Summer's Day

 

This painting shows two women sitting in a rowboat. It was created in the Bois de Boulogne. This painting was painted by Morisot using a very unusual palette.

The dark blue coat of the woman to the right was painted by Morisot in cerulean, a rare color used by Impressionists. The green leaves are painted with a mix of viridian and lead white. At this time, cadmium yellow was not widely used.

Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas is known for his oil paintings and pastel drawings. He also produced bronze sculptures, prints, and drawings.

In addition to his famous ballet dancers and bathing women, Degas painted racehorses and racing jockeys, as well as portraits. His portraits are notable for their psychological complexity and for their portrayal of human isolation.

A Cotton Office in New Orleans

 

Degas shows the interior of Michel Musson, his maternal uncle's cotton company in New Orleans.

Musson, Degas, Degas's brothers Rene et Achille, Musson’s son-in law William Bell and other Musson associates are seen engaging in various business and leisure activities, while raw cotton rests on the table in the middle.

Mary Cassatt

Mary Cassatt

Mary Stevenson Cassatt was a printmaker and painter from the United States. She was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, but spent the majority of her adult life in France, where she met Edgar Degas and exhibited alongside the Impressionists. Cassatt frequently depicted the social and private lives of women, with a focus on the close relationships that exist between mothYou ers and their children.

The Boating Party

The Boating Party

Cassatt painted The Boating Party in Antibes, France, during the winter of 1893–1894. Cassatt and her mother spent January and February 1894 in the Villa "La Cigaronne" near Cap d'Antibes. Cassatt painted The Boating Party when she was 49 years old.

A woman, a baby, and a man in a sailboat are depicted in The Boating Party. The boat has three thwarts, a canoe stern, and no boom. The boat's interior is described as yellow. It's a unique painting in Cassatt's collection. While it depicts her well-known subject of a mother and infant, the majority of her other works are situated in interiors or gardens. It's also one of her most substantial oil works.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Another important figure in the creation of the Impressionist style was Pierre-Auguste Renoir, a French painter. Renoir was influenced by prior contemporary artists Camille Pissarro and Édouard Manet's style and subject matter.

Following a series of rejections by Salon juries, he teamed up with Monet, Sisley, Pissarro, and other Impressionists to stage the first Impressionist show in April 1874, in which Renoir exhibited six paintings. Renoir's paintings are known for their vivid light and saturated color, and they frequently depict individuals in intimate and honest settings.

Two Sisters (On the Terrace)

Two Sisters (On the Terrace)

Renoir worked on the picture on the terrace of the Maison Fournaise, a restaurant in Chatou, a western suburb of Paris, located on an island in the Seine.

A young woman and her younger sister are sat outside with a tiny basket containing wool balls in the painting. With the River Seine behind it, one can glimpse vegetation and foliage over the rails of the terrace.

Camille Pissarro

Camille Pissarro

Camille Pissarro, a Danish-French Impressionist and Neo-Impressionist painter, was born on the island of St Thomas in the Caribbean (now in the US Virgin Islands, but then in the Danish West Indies). His contributions to Impressionism and Post-Impressionism make him significant.

Pissarro drew inspiration from masters such as Gustave Courbet and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. When he took up the Neo-Impressionist style at the age of 54, he studied and worked alongside Georges Seurat and Paul Signac.

Le Boulevard de Montmartre, Matinée de Printemps

Le Boulevard de Montmartre, Matinée de Printemps

Camille Pissarro's work, Le Boulevard de Montmartre, Matinée de Printemps depicts Paris' Boulevard Montmartre. It was auctioned at Sotheby's in London on 5 February 2014 for £19,682,500, more than double its pre-sale estimate.

Gustave Caillebotte

Gustave Caillebotte

Gustave Caillebotte was a French painter who was a member and patron of the Impressionists, while painting in a more realistic style than many of his contemporaries.

Caillebotte's early interest in photography as an art form was well-known. Many home and familial settings, interiors, and portraits were painted by Caillebotte. Caillebotte is most known for his paintings of metropolitan Paris, such as The Europe Bridge, in which he depicts members of his family.

Paris Street; Rainy Day

 

Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894)'s best-known work, Paris Street; Rainy Day, is a big 1877 oil painting by the French artist Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894). It depicts a group of people going through the Place de Dublin, then known as the Carrefour de Moscou, in north Paris, at a crossroads east of the Gare Saint-Lazare.

Although Caillebotte was a friend and supporter of many impressionist painters, and this piece is considered part of that school, it is distinguished by its realism and reliance on line rather than sweeping brushstrokes. The picture debuted at the 1877 Third Impressionist Exhibition. The Art Institute of Chicago currently owns it.

Alfred Sisley

Alfred Sisley

Alfred Sisley was an Impressionist landscape painter who was born in France and lived there for the majority of his life, but kept his British citizenship. He was the most dedicated of the Impressionists to painting landscapes in the open air (i.e., outdoors). He only dabbled in figure painting on rare occasions, and, unlike Renoir and Pissarro, he felt Impressionism to be sufficient for his creative demands.

Camille Pissarro and Edouard Manet, two previous modern painters, inspired him with their style and subject matter. Sisley has been overshadowed among the Impressionists by Monet, whose work he mimics in style and subject matter, while Sisley's effects are more subdued.

The Bridge at Villeneuve-la-Garenne

The Bridge at Villeneuve-la-Garenne

The cast-iron and stone suspension bridge that was built in 1844 to connect the village of Villeneuve-la-Garenne with the Paris neighborhood of Saint-Denis is depicted in this close-up painting, sharply angled perspective.

Sisley added color to the scene by depicting tourists on the Seine and along the riverbank. Flat, high-keyed color strokes depict the transitory appearance of sunshine on water.

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