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Top 20 El Greco Famous Paintings [Fine Art Masterpieces]
Dawit Abeza
Top 20 El Greco Famous Paintings [Fine Art Masterpieces]

Top 20 El Greco Famous Paintings [Fine Art Masterpieces]

El Greco Self-portrait

El Greco Self-portrait

El Greco is likely one of the most notable artists of his time, and still right up 'til the present time, more than 500 years after his passing. In light of the lack of definition in his style, and the way that he was viewed as a painter of the soul, he was one of the most persuasive painters, which set the foundation for some to pursue, and for some, art frames that pursued. His work was appreciated by the individuals from the Blue Rider School, and a few artists who pursued, far after his profession finished. El Greco dismissed naturalism as a vehicle for his art similarly as he dismissed the possibility of art effectively open to a huge open. What he grasped was simply the universe of an intentionally, savvy style, or manner. The Catch 22 is that, when the obtrusive presentation of artifice natural in Mannerism was being censured as an extravagance, and artists in Rome were endeavoring to free their paintings of anything that may appear to be an unimportant showcase, El Greco took the exact inverse course. He made lengthened, winding structures, radical foreshortening, and unbelievable hues the very premise of his art. The thing that matters was that he made these impacts profoundly expressive and not only symbols of virtuosity.

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El Greco Artworks

View of Toledo by El Greco

View of Toledo by El Greco

In this, his most prominent enduring landscape, El Greco depicts the city he lived and worked in for the greater part of his life. The painting has a place with the convention of the meaningful city sees, as opposed to a loyal narrative portrayal. The perspective on the eastern area of Toledo from the north would have prohibited the house of God, which the artist in this way inventively moved to one side of the Alcázar (the illustrious royal residence). Different structures spoke to in the painting incorporate the antiquated Alcántara Bridge, and on the opposite side of the stream Tagus, the Castle of San Servando. It remains among probably the best artwork of El Greco where the Western sky is delineated radiantly. Toledo in Spain is a spot near El Greco's heart since he spent the most recent long stretches of his life there. The scene portrayed here is that of the cloudy sky just before a tempest is to set in. He plays splendidly with dim and light as found in his introduction of the dim and shady sky above, diverged from the green, energetic slopes beneath, in this manner giving his painting a profound measurement.

Completed: 1596 - 1600

Style: Mannerism

Measurements: 121.3 cm × 108.6 cm

Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Holy Trinity by El Greco

The Holy Trinity by El Greco

The Heavenly Father, with an Eastern Miter on his head, holds the group of Christ in his lap. The pigeon of the Holy Ghost shows up over his head, while six youthful blessed messengers encompass the scene. A few seraphs' heads show up at Jesus' feet and under God the Father's robes. In view of an etching by Albrecht Dürer, this was one of El Greco's initially appointed pieces in Toledo. One particular part of El Greco's pictorial virtuoso is uncovered here with uncommon consideration. This is the inclination of the bond, of the figure's coherence with the substance, so to speak, of another figure or of the encompassing milieu. This inclination, which was later to turn into the all-pervading stylish and mental power of El Greco's art, is given here still in its beginning period of articulation, contacting just little parts of the image's field. It is available in the firmly attached pack of seraphs' heads at the foot of the dead Christ, the toes of his foot, the bottom of the heavenly attendant confronting Christ, the half-unmistakable hand of the Father sup-porting his Son's body. In fact, this exceptional pictorial achievement is accomplished by contradicting moment zones of high lights - nearly sprinkles of light to the dim and thick diagrams intently encompassing them. A sentiment of grayness - haggard and ashy - glides over the whole size of hues and appears to be even to curb the sparkle of brilliant glow which immerses every one of the structures. As though as opposed to the rich power of the life structures, El Greco appears to have wished to pass on to us, through the voice of this melancholy dim, the feeling of present demise - of the dead Body grieved before us.

Completed: 1577 - 1579

Style: Northern Renaissance

Measurements: 300 cm x 179 cm

Location: Museo Nacional del Prado

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Disrobing of Christ by El Greco

The Disrobing of Christ by El Greco

The Disrobing of Christ, which was painted for a room used to house strict relics in Toledo basilica, delineates the minute when Christ has climbed to Calvary and is deprived of his garments before being nailed to the cross. In this profoundly unique organization, in view of the scope of both artistic and visual sources, the customary space has been packed so as to pass on Christ's physical and mental enduring to the watcher. The exceptional expressiveness of the heads planned to offer a total collection of pictorial arrangements, uncovers the degree of artistic dominance accomplished by El Greco at this period. The painting's magnificent condition of conservation has implied that crafted by the Prado's restorer Rafael Alonso has basically comprised of filling in and solidifying little regions of lifting and paint misfortunes at the lower edge, notwithstanding cleaning the work. The outcome has been to recuperate the equalization of lights and shades, improving the spatial and chromatic relations and thus the general visual perusing of the work.

Completed: 1577 - 1579

Style: Northern Renaissance

Measurements: 285 cm × 173 cm

Location: Sacristy of Toledo Cathedral

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Miracle of Christ Healing the Blind by El Greco

The Miracle of Christ Healing the Blind by El Greco

It delineates the Gospel record of Christ mending a blind man by blessing his eyes. The two figures in the forefront might be the blind man's folks. The upper left segment of the piece is incomplete. El Greco painted two different variants of the subject and appears to have taken this one with him to Spain. The subject of the painting is the New Testament story of Jesus reestablishing seeing a blind man by blessing his eyes. This subject was well known at the time as the relieving of blindness was emblematic of the disclosure of genuine confidence. This painting is viewed as perhaps the best work of El Greco's initial vocation.

Completed: 1567

Style: Venetian Renaissance

Measurements: 119.4 cm x 146.1 cm

Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Christ Carrying the Cross by El Greco

Christ Carrying the Cross by El Greco

During his long profession in Spain, El Greco delivered various paintings of Christ conveying the cross. The Lehman canvas, seemingly his soonest form of the subject, is certifiably not a story scene: no different figures are spoken to and the setting isn't unmistakable. Rather, it is a reverential picture of frequenting quickness and full with feeling. Christ's willing penance for mankind is communicated through his delicate grasp of the cross and his heavenward look. Christ conveying the cross while leaving an adventure to Cavalry before being executed, is a significant topic in Christian confidence, discovering its way to a few gems. Greco also tried different things with this subject and displayed Christ clad in red clothing alongside blue robes. He clutches the cross with very little exertion, and his face bears an appearance neither of agony nor anguish, yet a surrendered look, with eyes looking towards paradise. This introduction of El Greco makes a profound mystery.

Completed: 1580

Style: Renaissance

Measurements: 105 cm × 79 cm

Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (El entierro del conde de Orgaz) by El Greco

The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (El entierro del conde de Orgaz) by El Greco

It was dispatched by the area cleric of Santo Tomé in Toledo and is viewed as a prime case of Mannerism. Alongside Tintoretto, Agnolo Bronzino, Jacopo da Pontormo, and others, El Greco is viewed as one of the fundamental Mannerist artists. His commitment to the advancement of the development is set apart by visual structures that moved away from an admired flawlessness into a world accused of strain and enthusiastic intricacy through a structure, creative mind, and articulation. El Greco alluded to this painting as his 'brilliant work.' The Burial of Count of Orgaz is a famous legend in Toledo of a devout and magnanimous man who left an enormous total of cash to the congregation after his demise and was hence covered and accompanied to paradise by Saint Stephen and Saint Augustine. The funerary scene is depicted at the base of the painting, with the Count encompassed by the two holy people, trailed by other aristocrats and priests of the time in sixteenth-century attire, caught in a static way. It is stood out from the divine realm in paradise that incorporates Mary, Christ, God, John the Baptist, and the blessed messengers, who all watch the scene, delineated in a progressively natural free-streaming way, to speak to the impalpability and superfluity of soul. The little fellow at the left is said to be Jorge Manuel, the artist's child. One potential elucidation that is in the juxtaposition of the universes: the physical universe of earth and the profound universe of paradise, each depicted in their own particular manners. Earth is caught in an ordinary scale with progressively corresponding figures, though paradise is made out of whirling mists and unique shapes, with an increasingly impalpable quality to the figures. This reasonable qualification incredibly takes into consideration two thoughts: from one perspective, a joining between the two universes is proposed, on the other, the detachment of the universes is improved. Another translation is delivered by art Historian Dr. Vida Hull who claims the painting speaks to "a visionary experience." In her view, the formless character and the prolongation of the bodies all pass on a profound otherworldliness, as it is the spirit of the Count that is being raised to paradise.

Completed: 1586

Style: Renaissance

Measurements: 480 cm × 360 cm

Location: Iglesia de Santo Tomé, Toledo, Spain

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Opening of the Fifth Seal (The Vision of Saint John) by El Greco

Opening of the Fifth Seal (The Vision of Saint John) by El Greco

The painting is a section from a huge altarpiece dispatched for the congregation of the emergency clinic of Saint John the Baptist in Toledo. It delineates an entry in the Bible, Revelation (6:9-11) portraying the opening of the Fifth Seal toward the finish of time, and the conveyance of white robes to "the individuals who had been killed for crafted by God and for the observer they had borne." The missing upper part may have indicated the Sacrificial Lamb opening the Fifth Seal. The canvas was a famous work for twentieth-century artists and Picasso, who knew it in Paris, utilized it as a motivation for Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.

Completed: 1608 - 1614

Style: Renaissance

Measurements: 224.8 cm × 199.4 cm

Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Annunciation by El Greco

Annunciation by El Greco

In the painting, Mary is welcomed by a heavenly attendant who offers the news that she is pregnant with a child. The scene speaks to the minute Mary acknowledges the news, symbolized by the blessed messenger's position with his hands crossed as though revering Jesus' mother. A beam of light joins the earthly and heavenly universes as a bird drops to speak to the Holy Spirit. On ventures at the base of the painting are a sewing crate and flower shrub set the land on fire. Set among Mary and the heavenly attendant, the consuming shrub reflects the equivalent blazing picture seen by Moses. The bramble is land however not consumed to speak to Mary's virginity. On the means is a cloak on the sewing container, a gesture to an Armenian story where Mary chips away at such an article of clothing when the celestial detachment shows up. Over the two focal figures are heavenly attendants playing music. The flares of the consuming flower shrub are naturalistic and copy genuine blazes from a light consuming on a special stepped area. When making strict pictures or authentic figures from folklore, El Greco often depicted these figures and pictures as sensible and normally proportioned. This often appeared differently in relation to the tormented and stretched delineations of other subjects. In contrast to other works by the Greek artist, figures in The Annunciation are generally proportionate. Here, it is light and color that are misshaped to make a scene that is in a condition of steady change. The colors and brushstrokes are utilized to inspire feelings rather than the figures themselves. The background is blue and dim, appearing differently in relation to the energetic yellow, blue, blood red and green of the righteous figures and bird.

Completed: 1609

Style: Mannerism

Measurements: 294 cm × 204 cm

Location: Private Collection, Madrid

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Laocoön by El Greco

Laocoön by El Greco

Quick and horrible was the discipline of Laocoon, a minister of Apollo at Troy, and his two children. As per legend, he had debased the sanctuary of the god; and moreover, he had acquired the anger of Athene for having cautioned the Trojans against the wooden steed. The popular thus persuasive marble gathering recently vestige, unearthed in 1506, depicts the cleric and his children in their vain battle with the snakes sent to wreck them. However, while the figure communicates a network of discipline, El Greco, in painting this subject, wished rather to express the segregation, the individual duty, of the three unfortunate casualties. Every one of the figures battles with his fate in his own detached manner, without respect or pity for the others. We don't know whether the fallen youth is mortally injured by the snake, or effectively dead. Furthermore, the other child, upstanding and investigating the cloud-stacked sky, may have gotten away in this adaptation of Greco's the snake's venom, as he has just gotten away from the expressively weak curls.

Completed: 1610 - 1614

Style: Mannerism

Measurements: 137.5 cm x 172.5 cm

Location: National Gallery of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Crucifixion by El Greco

Crucifixion by El Greco

El Greco's portrays demise and life in "Crucifixion". This painting, which was finished in 1600, exhibits the artist's direction of the structure. His utilization of color brings watchers into the painting, even as some are probably going to ponder man's brutality to man. Lethal torment and penance are subjects that are investigated here. Agony and expectation are additionally observed, as spectators crowd the withering Christ. El Greco tends to join realism with extraordinary tones. His figures here have a quality that lifts them to another domain. In their demeanor, they speak to huge quantities of individuals who respond to Christ's penance in the manner they are appeared to do in "Crucifixion". At the foot of the Cross, watchers see a figure who is conceivably the Magdalene. Most occasions she is depicted as a figure speaking to the individuals who are most insightful of the agonizing impacts man's indecencies have had on human life. While Christ's demise might be agonizing to watch, it opens the entryway to her tranquility. The figure of Christ is centered upwards. Figures of holy messengers and people are situated around the cross in the central zone. Pairings incorporate that of the Annunciation with the Flames and the Dove. The figure of the Archangel Gabriel has its partner in the figure of Saint John. The lady of Joy is incorporated there to coordinate the lady who is in Grief.

Completed: 1597 - 1600

Style: Realism

Measurements: 312 cm X 169 cm

Location: Museo Nacional Del Prado

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Assumption of the Virgin by El Greco

Assumption of the Virgin by El Greco

This tremendous painting by El Greco (The Greek) was the artist's first significant bonus when he landed in quite a while received the nation of Spain in the wake of preparing in Italy. It was appointed for the focal board of the high raised area of the congregation of Santo Domingo el Antiguo in Toledo. The narrative of the Assumption—when the Virgin Mary was taken up to paradise—depends on the spurious record by Saint James, who is delineated holding his book. The subject was spoken to frequently by artists, yet El Greco's treatment of the topic is striking. He isolated his canvas into two zones, an earthly circle of missionaries and the eminent circle of holy messengers. The missionaries, masterminded around, move in the direction of one another in wonder and perplexity. Above, holy messengers express their delight. Mary ascends from her tomb on a bow moon, an image of her virtue. Despite the fact that she has totally entered the awesome domain, the sew of her dress falls gently over the sickle, associating her to earth. El Greco's work is a case of the Mannerist style he characterized in which figures are stretched, shrouded in plentiful drapery, and wander aimlessly significantly. The story of the Assumption unfurls through the decided signals of the characters: the imploring hands of the holy messengers, the outstretched arms of the Virgin, the pointing finger of the witness, and the nimbly improved palm of the unidentified man to one side, which is accentuated by a break in the mists. The artist's utilization of glimmering, high-keyed colors and wide brushwork further loan the work a happy inclination looked for after by Catholic Church supporters during the Counter-Reformation. El Greco utilized such intense colors and figural courses of action to excite an otherworldly enthusiasm in the watcher and impart the profound feeling of confidence he himself felt.

Completed: 1577 - 1579

Style: Religious Art

Measurements: 403.2 cm x 211.8 cm

Location: Art Institute of Chicago

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Portrait of Cardinal Nino de Guevara by El Greco

Portrait of Cardinal Nino de Guevara by El Greco

This exceptional picture delineates Fernando Niño de Guevara (1541–1609), who in 1596 was named cardinal and is dressed in that capacity here. In 1599 he moved toward becoming Inquisitor General of Spain however surrendered in 1602 to serve an incredible remainder as Archbishop of Seville. The painting most likely dates from the spring of 1600 when the cardinal was in Toledo with Philip III and individuals from the Madrid court. El Greco had lived in Venice and in the Farnese Palace in Rome, where Titian's representations, (for example, those of the Farnese Pope Paul III) would have uncovered to the Greek painter the mental potential outcomes of the picture.

Completed: 1598

Style: Religious Art

Measurements: 170.8 cm x 108cm

Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

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The Adoration of the Shepherds by El Greco

The Adoration of the Shepherds by El Greco

This night scene is set in a thin, sporadic space - a kind of cave with a gabled opening in the back, comprising of two semi-roundabout curves. Mary holds her infant Son, exposed on her lap, while Saint Joseph and three shepherds encompass them, communicating their intense dedication to the kid. A stooping bull additionally thinks about the infant. As was regular with El Greco's last works, the assemblages of the shepherds are impressively contorted from their characteristic structures, standing out from the more old-style appearance of the holy messengers who fly over the scene. This, joined with the abnormal points and postures of the characters, was proposed to give an impression of the overjoyed miracle. There is a lot of complexity among light and shade in the work, with the mix of this and the image's splendid colors expected to further increase the feeling that the passerby is an observer to a world-evolving occasion.

Completed: 1612 -1614

Style: History painting

Measurements: 319 cm x 180 cm

Location: Museo Nacional Del Prado

Medium: Oil on canvas

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Resurrection by El Greco

Resurrection by El Greco

The topic is the significant topic of Greco's art: the seeing of the body's levitation: this self-freedom of the body offers the sole unmistakable confirmation of the soul's triumph over the issue, as this enchanted idea would be communicated in verbal and innocent terms. The observers in El Greco share in the movement of the occasion. The descending draw of the fallen fighter's considerable weight obstructs the not less impressive upward surge of different officers; this makes such an upheaval of uneasiness and departures among the bodies that, so as to avoid the obliteration of every one of them, a unique outlet must be found. The outlet exists in the practically elusive push a push communicated by the void between the tip of the foot and the tip of the flagstaff given to the recently made youthful assortment of Christ. A phenomenal, yet normal, the rising of this glowing new body is accomplished. The confusion of bodies in disturbance beneath winds up going with help; the balance of mood is restored and with it the progression and interconnection of subject and example.

Completed:1600

Style: Christian Art

Measurements: 275 cm x 127 cm

Location: Museo Nacional Del Prado

Medium: Oil on canvas

The Ecstasy of St. Francis of Assisi by El Greco

The Ecstasy of St. Francis of Assisi by El Greco

The painting delineates the joy of St. Francis, a mainstream subject in old-style art additionally delineated via Caravaggio in 1595, by Giovanni Bellini in 1475, by Giovanni Baglione in 1601, and different infamous artists whom were altogether attracted to the story. It portrays the scene from the incredible existence of Saint Francis of Assisi, a twelfth-century Italian holy person, who two years before his passing in 1224, set out on a voyage to Mount La Verna for forty days of fasting and supplication. One morning as he implored, he went into a strict euphoria and got the stigmata (the signs of Christ upon his body as he was nailed to the cross) by a heavenly attendant or seraph. In the painting, El Greco depicts St. Francis in this precise minute with a face brimming with the feelings of dedication, torment, and give up. Before the Saint is a skull, generally connected with the Saint, and an image of mortality. El Greco was entranced with this subject, as it is commonly supported that his workshop had over a hundred portrayals of St. Francis. Be that as it may, in this painting, El Greco administers his typical light, colorful and brilliant portrayals, and makes a generally dull and solemn air to re-make the excruciating and sensational experience of the Saint. Despite the fact that the painting is additionally a case of Mannerism, its utilization of high differentiation murkiness and light appears to be suggestive of another artistic language that can be related to the sensational works of Rembrandt in the seventeenth century.

Completed:1600

Style: Christian Art

Measurements: 102 cm x 75 cm

Location: Muzeum Diecezjalne w Siedlcach

Medium: Oil on canvas

Christ Blessing The Saviour of the World by El Greco

Christ Blessing The Saviour of the World by El Greco

This painting portrays Christ holding one hand on a blue globe, and motioning to paradise with the other. There is a white light sparkling either from behind him or from inside him, going about as a radiance against the dark dim foundation. It is painted in El Greco's mark liquid style and has a significant tasteful and mental power, for the most part, conceded by the exceptional look of Christ's eyes that gaze profoundly into the spectator. The striking splendid red color of his robes profoundly stands out from the stifled and solemn color utilized in the remainder of the painting. As is normal for his assemblage of work, the extended fingers and middle, profoundly aroused by Tintoretto and Titian, award the painting a fanciful quality that is both genuine and significantly unworldly, appearing to cause Christ to have a place, physically and figuratively, to the two universes. This work mirrors a genuine case of El Greco's method of joining an increasingly Byzantine notorious convention with the more humanistic methodology of the Renaissance, while as yet dismissing a definite impersonation of the real world. As Art antiquarian Keith Christiansen claims, "El Greco dismissed naturalism as a vehicle for his art similarly as he dismissed the possibility of art effectively available to a huge open. What he grasped was simply the universe of an intentionally, savvy style, or maniera," profoundly connected with Mannerism. By denying his general surroundings and moving endlessly from practical and naturalistic dialects, he typifies the domain of the soul through development and opportunity of structure in an emblematic and figurative manner.

Completed:1600

Style: Mannerism

Measurements: 73 cm x 56 cm

Location: Scottish National Gallery

Medium: Oil on canvas

Madonna and Child with Saint Martina and Saint Agnes by El Greco

Madonna and Child with Saint Martina and Saint Agnes by El Greco

Madonna and Child with Saint Martina and Saint Agnes portrays Mary and the baby Jesus situated on mists in paradise, joined by Saint Agnes holding a sheep on the base right and Saint Martina on the base left. The figures overwhelm the vast majority of this huge scale painting, interweaving with one another in a complex associated way. The painting was initially set inverse another of El Greco's paintings, Saint Martin and the Beggar, in the Chapel of Saint Joseph in Toledo and speaks to an assortment of work made somewhere in the range of 1957 and 1607 of different commissions portraying his develop period. This work is a case of his profoundly expressive nature and adapted way to deal with structure. The utilization of splendid dynamic colors, that is likewise so normal for El Greco's paintings is particularly present in the work, highlighting the shrouds of the holy messengers and Mary in profound reds, blues, and yellows. For El Greco, the utilization of color was viewed as an essential element of each painting, significantly more than structure, and he suspected it was a significantly mind-boggling issue guaranteeing that he considered the impersonation of color "to be the best trouble of art."

Completed: 1597 - 1599

Style: Mannerism

Measurements: 193.5 cm x 103 cm

Location: National Gallery of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

Saint Martin and the Beggar by El Greco

Saint Martin and the Beggar by El Greco

Charged for the Chapel of San José in Toledo by Martín Ramírez, a namesake of the holy person and giver of the sanctuary, Saint Martin and the Beggar was part of one of the artist's best gatherings. The holy person, who lived during the rule of Constantine the Great, was an individual from the magnificent mounted force positioned close Amiens, in Gaul. Happening upon a shuddering poor person close to the city doors on a virus winter day, the youthful warrior separated his shroud with his sword and imparted it to him. El Greco depicted the fourth-century holy person as a youthful aristocrat, clad in an exquisite gold-damascened shield, with on leg on each side of a white Arabian pony. Seen from a low vantage point, the figures appear to be grand, approaching over the scene with its far off perspective on Toledo and the waterway Tagus. The holy person's moderately naturalistic extents diverge from the constricted type of the almost naked homeless person. The conspicuous contortion of the bum's structure proposes that he isn't of this world and clues at the later disclosure of his actual personality in Martin's fantasy.

Completed: 1597 - 1599

Style: Mannerism

Measurements: 6.4 cm x 3.5 cm

Location: National Gallery of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

Saint Jerome by El Greco

Saint Jerome by El Greco

El Greco executed, in any event, five paintings of Saint Jerome. In this rendition, from the most recent long stretches of the painter's life, the holy person has appeared in the red vestments of a cardinal, situated before an open book, a trait showing his job as an interpreter of the Bible from Greek into Latin in the fifth century. His emaciated indented highlights and long white facial hair allude to his recognizable pretense as a contrite, reviewing his retreat to the Syrian desert. The painting is prominent for the novel manner by which the artist blended the two parts of Saint Jerome, the academic and the plain.

Completed: 1609

Style: Mannerism

Measurements: 108 cm × 87 cm

Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Medium: Oil on canvas

Portrait of Vincenzo Anastagi by El Greco

Portrait of Vincenzo Anastagi by El Greco

El Greco landed in Rome in 1570 and he was prescribed by Giulio Clovio to his benefactor Cardinal Alessandro Farnese as a portrait painter. His portraiture grew significantly during his Roman stay, arriving at a top in his portrait of Vincenzo Anastagi. The sitter was a recognized Knight of Malta, who had been delegated 'sergente maggiore' of Castel Sant'Angelo in 1575. The portrait was likely painted to celebrate the arrangement. For El Greco, it was a significant test, for he appears to be never beforehand to have painted a full-length or military or authority portrait. The defensive layer, sword, cap, the green baldric and velvet breeches ornamented with gold string, are the characteristics of his station. However, El Greco has not restricted himself to reproducing these particulars. He has tried to make show Anastagi's body politic too - in particular, the cardinal ethicalness of mettle, containing mental fortitude, perseverance, and physical quality. Disregarding the characteristics of the portrait, the scarcity of the surviving and recorded portraits which El Greco painted in Rome proposes that commissions were not inevitable, most likely in light of the fact that his Titianesque strategy was not acknowledged.

Completed: 1575

Style: Mannerism

Measurements: 188 cm × 126.7 cm

Location: Frick Collection

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

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