Cart
{[{jc.cart.data.item_count}]} product products
There are no products in your cart!
{[{ item.product_title }]}
{[{ item.variant_title }]}
{[{ item.price }]}
{[{ item.original_price }]}
Subtotal
{[{ jc.cart.data.total_price }]}
{[{jc.cart.data.total_discount}]}
Camille Pissarro Famous Paintings | Reproduction Of Fine Arts
Dawit Abeza
Camille Pissarro Famous Paintings | Reproduction Of Fine Arts

Camille Pissarro Famous Paintings | Reproduction Of Fine Arts

Camille Pissarro, in full Jacob-Abraham-Camille Pissarro, painter, and printmaker who was a key figure throughout the entire existence of Impressionism. Pissarro painted rural and urban French life, particularly landscapes in and around Pontoise, as well as scenes from Montmartre. Here are some of Camille Pissarro's famous artworks.

 

The Boulevard Montmartre on a Winter Morning by Camille Pissarro

The Boulevard Montmartre on a Winter Morning by Camille Pissarro

This is one of a few pieces that Pissarro did recording the clamoring life of Paris. Pissarro had as of late come back to the city in the wake of going through 6 years in the more rustic town of Éragny around 25 miles northwest of Paris. Paris was presently a blasting city and was the spot to be for art, business, and exchange. The few Exposition Universelles presented the metro and the Eiffel Tower which re-imagined what a city could be. Pissarro perceived this and needed to record the new quick pace of city life. Pissarro painted this perspective on Boulevard Montmartre from his hotel window at the Grand Hôtel de Russie from where he made a series of thirteen paintings. In his later years, Pissarro was battling repetitive eye contamination and as he needed to keep away from the virus wind, he could just paint outside in a warm climate. To proceed with his work all year, he leased hotel rooms on upper levels all through Paris and would paint these amazing winged creatures eye see scenes that he could see simply outside his window. This method was a triumph for him, and Pissarro did this in different hotels all through a few urban areas.

Learn more about The Boulevard Montmartre On A Winter Morning

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1897

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: Height: 64.8 cm (25.5 ″); Width: 81.3 cm (32 ″)

Location: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

The Hermitage at Pontoise by Camille Pissarro

The Hermitage at Pontoise by Camille Pissarro

The Hermitage at Pontoise ( Les coteaux de l'Hermitage, Pontoise )The view spoke to here is a winding town way at the base of a group of houses in Pontoise, France, known as the Hermitage. Camille Pissarro lived there on and off somewhere in the range of 1866 and 1883, picking the country environs of the common capital for a series of huge scale scenes that have been called his initial perfect works of art. Pissarro's idyll, loaded with locals and perfectly tended nurseries, is something beyond the naturalist painter's consideration regarding apparent reality. It is a continuation of the French scholastic scene convention, which extended from the moral stories of Poussin to the proto-Cubist scenes of Paul Cézanne, who contemplated and worked with Pissarro. Pissarro stripped his composition of the recorded or wistful over-tones that portrayed the scenes of his quick antecedents. What's more, he utilized light and dull, exhibiting over a negligible enthusiasm for the impacts of sun and shade.

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1867

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 5′ 0″ x 6′ 7″

Location: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

 

Le Boulevard de Montmartre, Matinée de Printemps by Camille Pissarro

Le Boulevard de Montmartre, Matinée de Printemps by Camille Pissarro

Being part of a series, Boulevard Montremarte shows Pissarro's duty to a similar subject and how he can concentrate on various conditions of feeling and temperaments. Inconspicuous changes in climate, light, and climate can be found in every one of the manifestations in the Boulevard Montremarte series, Pissarro experts these components. The Boulevard Montremarte series was finished by Camille Pissarro in only two months inside the bounds of a hotel room. Watching out from the window, he took very nearly three hours for lunch every day except apart from that, he painted. Pissarro's utilization of brushstrokes are practically unconstrained and erotic. The impressionist artist needed to move away from the unconcerned procedures of painting previously (as he saw them) and carry some more life to the artwork. Camille Pissarro went over certain troubles while painting the Boulevard Montremarte series. With the clamoring city life of carriages and individuals just as the structures which must be set at another plot with the end goal of artwork. He did, in the long run, conquer these issues through difficult work and commitment. Pissarro carried enthusiasm and life to the entirety of the paintings inside the Boulevard Montremarte series.

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1897

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: w 810 x h 650 cm

Location: Private Collection

 

The Boulevard Montmartre at Night by Camille Pissarro

The Boulevard Montmartre at Night by Camille Pissarro

The artistic creation shows ladies taking a shot at the harvest in the French people group of Éragny on the River Epte. In the year's paving the way to his demise, the Danish-French artist, Camille Pissarro lived in the French town of Eragny. The town was the subject for some of his works including provincial life. Two years before his passing in 1903 he painted the artwork known as Hay Harvest at Éragny. While living in Éragny, Pissarro painted scenes of scenes just as ordinary errands performed by the rustic network. The agrarian laborers in his paintings show up as a characteristic part of the scene. This is obvious from his 1897 artistic creation titled, The Harvest of Hay in Éragny. The entirety of this changed when he painted Hay Harvest at Éragny in 1901. As opposed to being a scene, the focal point of the artistic creation moved to it is one where the lady farmworkers were the subject, like Van Gogh's The Potato Eaters. Taking a gander at the work of art, Pissarro has made the fields obvious in just a little part of the foundation. He does this by utilizing trees to conceal part of the view. The outcome is that the emphasis is on the five lady farmworkers remaining before the trees. Two of the ladies are working the hay while the others seem occupied with discussion. Pissarro's situating of the ladies gives a feeling of cadence and coherence over the artwork's closer view.

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1897

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 53.3 x 64.8 cm

Location: The National Gallery

 

Red roofs, corner of a village, winter by Camille Pissarro

Red roofs, corner of a village, winter by Camille Pissarro

Red roofs, corner of a village, winter, makes clear the theoretical component of this work by Camille Pissarro. In this painting, he moves away from an anecdotal idea of landscape. The planes are in parallel progression on the surface of the canvas. So the impression of profundity is rendered essentially by the decreasing size of the subjects. The slants of the roofs, varying from orange-red to dark-colored, appear to spread across the entire surface. The same tones can be found in the fields and plants in the closer view, as well as on the Côte St-Denis out of sight. The thick impasto catches the light and makes the brushstrokes vibrant, giving great power and sentiment of development on the painted surface.

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1877

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 1′ 9″ x 2′ 1″

Location: Musee d'Orsay

 

Pont Boieldieu in Rouen, Rainy Weather by Camille Pissarro

Pont Boieldieu in Rouen, Rainy Weather by Camille Pissarro

Pont Boieldieu in Rouen, Rainy Weather is an 1896 painting by Camille Pissarro in the assortment of the Art Gallery of Ontario. It is one of a series of paintings Pissarro did of Pont Boïeldieu and the industrial quays encompassing it. Pissarro invested energy in Rouen in 1896 looking to paint the industrial innovation of the area. He had earlier made an outing in 1883 and did one series of images of the city at that point. On his 1896 excursion, he stayed at the Hôtel de Paris in Rouen, from January to April 1896, and it is in this period that this painting was made. His room disregarded the Seine, and it is from this vantage point that it is painted. The subject is the Pont Boieldieu, an iron extension finished a couple of years before in 1885. Across the stream is the Gare d'Orléans train station and the Place Carnot square. The painting shows Pissarro's enthusiasm for moving past traditional landscape paintings of verdant rural scenes. His Rouen series instead centers around the clamor of the advanced city. The Rouen pictures would be trailed by a series of paintings of urban Paris. Style-wise, Pont Boieldieu in Rouen, Rainy Weather is an arrival to Impressionism after a decade of exploring different avenues regarding Post-Impressionism and Pointillism. Pissarro deliberately searched out a perspective on the bustling industrial segment of the town and created various paintings of the view from the inn in various light conditions and diverse weather.

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1896

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 2′ 5″ x 3′ 0″

Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

 

Place du Theatre-Francais, Spring by Camille Pissarro

Place du Theatre-Francais, Spring by Camille Pissarro

Pissarro portrayed that part of Paris near the Comedie Francaise, although the theater building itself remains outside the painting. The artist was intrigued not in famous perspectives, yet in the everyday existence of the city itself, for example, the stop for horse-drawn trams in the frontal area. With free, clearly differentiated strokes, the artist captures the traffic and minor human figures, the crisp spring leaves of the trees. He manages to pass on the atmosphere and the daylight, giving the city a clear charm. Like Claude Monet, Pissarro painted a series of paintings of the same urban scene in a variety of altogether different weathers and conditions; in his case, he accepting Paris as his main subject. The Hermitage canvas is from one such cycle of works, painted in a leased room in the Hotel du Louver watching out over the scene.

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1898

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 2′ 2″ x 2′ 8″

Location: The State Hermitage Museum

 

Entrance to the Village of Voisins by Camille Pissarro

Entrance to the Village of Voisins by Camille Pissarro

This is characteristic of many of Pissarro's paintings in that its synthesis is isolated and structured by the central road. The perspective is with the end goal that over half of the work is covered by the brilliant area of the sky. Compared to earlier works by Pissarro, it shows the impact of Monet in the brilliant palette and light brushstrokes. There is a solid, almost symmetrical, organization to the work, which is supported by the two gatherings of trees either side of the road and the long shadows cast by those on the left. The taller complex of structures tempers the generally rather inflexible evenness, while the steed and wagon dawdling along the road and the scattered figures enhance the tranquility of the painting. The outcome is an unassuming image typical of the artist's works of this period. It owes a lot to the paintings of Corot, who had advised Pissarro during the 1850s and without a doubt in organization and soul it is similar to Corot's Church of Marissel. Pissarro was one of only a handful, not many Impressionists to favor such natural scenes in inclination to those of city life and recreation.

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1872

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 55.5 x 46 cm

Location: Musée d'Orsay station

 

Portrait of Felix Pissarro by Camille Pissarro

Portrait of Felix Pissarro by Camille Pissarro

This is a portrait of the artist's third child, aged seven. In contrast to many different Impressionists, Camille Pissarro was worried in his portraits to pass on the traditional manner of the individual character. Here he has captured his child in a meditative, as well as marginally bored or frustrated, attitude. His child proceeded to be a painter and engraver yet passed on at the age of just twenty-three from tuberculosis while living at Kew, London.

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1881

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 55 x 46 cm

Location: Tate Britain, London, UK

 

The Pond at Montfoucault by Camille Pissarro

The Pond at Montfoucault by Camille Pissarro

Pissarro met Ludovic Piette in 1859 at the Academie Suisse in Paris, where the two artists had taken on a course. Although not as notable as Pissarro, Piette displayed regularly at the Salon during the 1860s and thirty of his paintings have appeared at the Impressionist Exhibition of 1877. Piette inhabited Montfoucault, a small village that lies on the outskirt among Normandy and Brittany. He repeatedly welcomed Pissarro to come and stay, and as the Franco-Prussian War broke out in 1870 it was there that Pissarro and his family had taken asylum before traversing to England.

Artist: Camille Pissarro

Created: 1875

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 92.7 x 73.6 cm

Location: Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham, UK

 

If you like this article, please share it with others, so perhaps they can also enjoy it. Any of the artwork purchased on ATX Fine Arts accommodates me as an artist, along with helping the site grow organically, thank you very much.

Leave a comment